involuntary euthanasia


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Related to involuntary euthanasia: passive euthanasia, active euthanasia

involuntary euthanasia

Euthanasia performed without a competent person's consent.
See also: euthanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
Institutions that proclaim the voluntariness of euthanasia in their official platforms make use of every opportunity to promote involuntary euthanasia as well.
Involuntary euthanasia is a situation when a patient's life is ended without the patient's knowledge.
We believe there is a clear case for a public inquiry into the increasingly widespread belief that involuntary euthanasia is a common occurrence in the NHS.
Through coercion, social pressure, or plain, old bad medicine, assisted suicide will slowly metamorphose into active, involuntary euthanasia.
Michael Willis, the chairman of the Pro-Life Alliance, said, "I think the BMA's statement is a disturbing development which indicates a softening on the present position which could lead to involuntary euthanasia.
Singer's "preference utilitarianism" even goes so far as to endorse infanticide and involuntary euthanasia for the disabled (LAETF, 1999).
Because this directive would be carried out without further consideration of the patient's wishes once she reached that stage, this proposal ventures into the territory of nonvoluntary euthanasia, and possibly involuntary euthanasia (in cases where the now-incompetent Alzheimer's patient appears to be relatively content).
While it is recognised that other subcategories exist, such as assisted suicide, rational suicide, suicide, and homicide (Rogers, 1996), the distinction between active, passive, voluntary, and involuntary euthanasia remains the most important element in examining attitudes toward physician-assisted death (Sugarman, 1986).
Indeed, there is a real possibility that such matters as abortion, assisted suicide, involuntary euthanasia, sado-masochism and homosexual marriage will come to dominate discussions of public policy.
More startling was how quickly physicians had slipped down the slope to involuntary euthanasia, unilaterally terminating the lives of competent patients, as distinct from those who were "out of it" Remmelink reported more than 1,000 cases of death caused or hastened without any request from the patient.
Another division between groups is between those who approve only of voluntary euthanasia by competent consenting patients and those who accept involuntary euthanasia decisions made by surrogates for neonates or in cases of incompetency.
The cases Altomare finds most alarming are those that enter the realm of involuntary euthanasia of competent adults.