involuntary euthanasia


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Related to involuntary euthanasia: passive euthanasia, active euthanasia

involuntary euthanasia

Euthanasia performed without a competent person's consent.
See also: euthanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
88) Opponents sharply criticized the bill as destroying the medical community and creating a slippery slope towards involuntary euthanasia.
Involuntary euthanasia is a situation when a patient's life is ended without the patient's knowledge.
The Nazi programme of active involuntary euthanasia targeted mentally incapacitated children.
Government-imposed involuntary euthanasia because Medicare Advantage is getting trimmed?
121) And, of course, he retained his original apprehensions about a slippery slope to nonvoluntary and involuntary euthanasia.
We believe there is a clear case for a public inquiry into the increasingly widespread belief that involuntary euthanasia is a common occurrence in the NHS.
Michael Willis, the chairman of the Pro-Life Alliance, said, "I think the BMA's statement is a disturbing development which indicates a softening on the present position which could lead to involuntary euthanasia.
Singer's "preference utilitarianism" even goes so far as to endorse infanticide and involuntary euthanasia for the disabled (LAETF, 1999).
The interviewer further addressed the controversial issue of involuntary euthanasia by asking whether participants thought they had the right to make the decision in regard to the death of a close family member.
Because this directive would be carried out without further consideration of the patient's wishes once she reached that stage, this proposal ventures into the territory of nonvoluntary euthanasia, and possibly involuntary euthanasia (in cases where the now-incompetent Alzheimer's patient appears to be relatively content).
While it is recognised that other subcategories exist, such as assisted suicide, rational suicide, suicide, and homicide (Rogers, 1996), the distinction between active, passive, voluntary, and involuntary euthanasia remains the most important element in examining attitudes toward physician-assisted death (Sugarman, 1986).
The Court found, for example, that the state has important interests in preserving life,(14) protecting the integrity and ethics of the medical profession,(15) protecting vulnerable groups,(16) and stopping the path to voluntary and even involuntary euthanasia.