inveterate

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inveterate

 [in-vet´er-it]
confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-āt),
Long seated; firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.
[L. in-vetero, pp. -atus, to render old, fr. vetus, old]

inveterate

/in·vet·er·ate/ (-vet´er-āt) confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-ăt)
Long seated; firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-ăt)
Firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.

inveterate

confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.
References in periodicals archive ?
While he makes no pretense to the contrary, because extra-parliamentary associations or what Bagini labels "popular party 'machines'" of the Chartist tradition (such as the Irish National League, the National Liberal Federation, and the Irish National Federation) inveterately played second fiddle to what transpired in both the Commons and the Lords, they remain ancillary in any study British and Irish politics in the period 1876-1906.
Inveterately dualistic as his sensibility was, Lawrence mistrusted monism as a cravenly facile solution to issues of relatedness.
The Jollity Building, the third book in the Library of America volume, collects his reporting on this usually-down but never-out crowd, to whose members Liebling was inveterately attracted.
Yet both of these cultures are inveterately ingrained in his character.
Here, "New things and old co-twisted, as if Time / Were nothing, so inveterately, that men / Were giddy gazing there" (11.
Touhig is, for some bizarre reason, inveterately anti-Wales and anti-Welsh.
The ideological debate regarding formalism and experimentation within the arts and its potentially revolutionary (or inveterately bourgeois) character did not begin nor end, however, with Stalin and the imposition of Socialist Realism as the official artistic doctrine of the Soviet Union.
In this case, I was driven to reflect deeply and inveterately on that hard law of life, which lies at the root of religion and is one of the most plentiful springs of distress.
Another point of departure was that Ben-Gurion was inveterately distrustful of anything and anyone British.
The greatest myth that has been woven around the Medvedev victory is that it represents some kind of political uncertainty, as the inveterately anti-Russian editorialists at The Economist claim, when there has really been less uncertainty about Medvedev's rise to power than there has been for any new head of state in recent history.
A secure writer, even if inveterately hostile to reigning views, does not need to deny or distort the achievements of others.
In Virginia, the home of Madison and many of the other intellectually dominant figures at the Constitutional Convention and First Congress, the colonists exercised the right inveterately.