inveterate

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Related to inveteracy: cadaverously

inveterate

 [in-vet´er-it]
confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-āt),
Long seated; firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.
[L. in-vetero, pp. -atus, to render old, fr. vetus, old]

inveterate

/in·vet·er·ate/ (-vet´er-āt) confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-ăt)
Long seated; firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.

in·vet·er·ate

(in-vet'ĕr-ăt)
Firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits.

inveterate

confirmed and chronic; long-established and difficult to cure.
References in periodicals archive ?
If She will have it that Her Characteris in the Second Part of this Poem, as aforesaid; let Her enjoy the Benefit and Satisfaction of her Conceptions: And take this along with Her, that 'tis to her own Unequal'd Pride and Inveteracy She owes the Addition of the Third Part of this Satyr,, which is Calculated for Her Meridian only: And I hope I have drawn Her in ev'ry Lineament so like, that even She her self will thank me for the Justice I have done her; and grant it Impossible that it shou'd be meant for any other Person.
In a letter to Albert Gallatin in 1810, Jefferson wrote about Marshall: "The judge's inveteracy is profound, and his mind of that gloomy malignity which will never let him forego the opportunity of satiating it on a victim.
Shakespeare points to the inveteracy of Leontes' way of thinking as wall--sixteen years of penance cannot change him completely.
Both blatant and latent anti-Semitism had been necessary pre-conditions for the massive deportations of Jews from the occupied societies, and it would be an underestimation of the inveteracy of anti-Semitism in western European societies to suppose that it suddenly disappeared with the discovery of the genocide in 1945.