inversion


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inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

/in·ver·sion/ (in-ver´zhun)
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

inversion of uterus  a turning of the uterus whereby the fundus is forced through the cervix, protruding into or completely outside of the vagina.
visceral inversion  the more or less complete right and left transposition of the viscera.

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.

inversion

[invur′zhən]
Etymology: L, invertere, to turn over
1 an abnormal condition in which an organ is turned inside out, such as a uterine inversion.
2 a chromosomal defect in which a segment of a chromosome breaks off and then reattaches to the chromosome in the reverse orientation, causing the genes carried on that part of the chromosome to be in an abnormal position and sequence.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

inversion

with reference to the foot: tilting of the sole inwards. inversion injury a common injury to the ankle joint in sport. Inversion of the foot usually occurs as a result of 'going over' on the ankle when the foot strikes the ground, especially if uneven or if the person is off balance. Results in damage to the lateral ligament complex, with bleeding, swelling and pain. Importantly affects proprioception and thus balance, necessitating a formal treatment and rehabilitation programme. See also anterior talofibular ligament; Figure 1.

inversion

turning inward

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion,

n the state of being upside down.

inversion

1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

paracentric inversion
the inverted segment does not include the chromosome's centromere; has exactly the same size and shape as a normal chromosome but will have different banding patterns.
pericentric inversion
an inversion in a chromosome in which the centromere is included in the inverted segment.
teat inversion
the tip is invaginated so that the orifice is closed by the act of sucking. Causes a problem to sucking pigs. Affected sows should be culled.
References in periodicals archive ?
The historical narrative reveals a repeated pattern of ex post inversion regulations, followed by a wave of inversions that exploit loopholes in the preceding regulations.
The first wave of inversions began with the 1983 McDermott transaction, which was the first major inversion to attract scrutiny from the IRS.
56) This Code provision remains the centerpiece for how companies structure their inversion transactions.
Los aumentos de la inversion en la mineria de cobre, como lo han senalado los ejecutivos de las principales empresas mineras del mundo, incluyendo Codelco, dependeran de la recuperacion del precio y de que las empresas mineras reduzcan sus altos niveles de endeudamiento.
Cuando nuestra economia entra en fases de estancamiento, como la actual, nos volvemos a acordar de un tercer elemento para promover la Inversion: la conveniencia de atraer inversion extranjera directa.
Por ultimo, aumentar la tasa de inversion de una economia es tambien un desafio politico.
This paper is the first part of a larger study on patterns in inversion sequences.
We use concatenation to add an element to the beginning or end of an inversion sequence: 0 * e is the inversion sequence (0, [e.
Observation 1 The inversion sequences avoiding 012 are those whose positive elements form a weakly decreasing sequence.
142) Whether that choice is a smart business decision or a condemnable act of desertion depends largely on one's views regarding the duties of a corporation, (143) where the blame for the inversion problem should lie, (144) and what a solution should look like.
149) Accordingly, undergoing an inversion may simply reflect the pursuit of a course to ameliorate a corporation's already significant tax burden, thereby increasing value, maximizing shareholder profits, and satisfying directors' fiduciary obligations.
For those who see inversions as merely an indicator of greater problems rooted in the US corporate tax system, there are several proactive changes that could be made to the Code, (158) in lieu of perpetuating the pattern of reactive regulations following every major inversion transaction.