introvert


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introvert

 [in´tro-vert]
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

in·tro·vert

(in'trō-vert),
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others. Compare: extrovert.
2. To turn a structure into itself, to invert.

introvert

/in·tro·vert/ (in´tro-vert)
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

introvert

(ĭn′trə-vûrt′, ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
tr.v. intro·verted, intro·verting, intro·verts
1. To turn or direct inward.
2. Psychology To concentrate (one's interests) upon oneself.
3. Medicine To turn (a tubular organ or part) inward upon itself.
n. (ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
1. Psychology An introverted person.
2. Medicine An anatomical structure that is capable of being introverted.

introvert

[in′trəvurt]
Etymology: L, intro + vertere, to turn
1 n, a person whose interests are directed inward and who is shy, withdrawn, emotionally reserved, and self-absorbed.
2 v, to turn inward or to direct one's interests and thoughts toward oneself. Compare ambivert, extrovert. See also egocentric.

introvert

Psychiatry A person who is introspective, self-conscious, often meticulous, a poor social mixer, who takes criticism too seriously. Cf Extrovert.

in·tro·vert

(intrō-vĕrt)
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others.
Compare: extrovert
2. To turn a structure into itself.

introvert

A person whose tendency of mind is to look inwards, to contemplate his or her own thoughts, feelings and emotions rather than to seek social intercourse. The introvert is often OBSESSIVE, anxious, HYPOCHONDRIACAL and solitary, more concerned with thought than with action. Compare EXTROVERT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The classroom is not the only place where introverts may be overshadowed.
The right fit: Introverts have natural abilities that are assets within the workplace.
Last month Steelcase, the global leader in the office furniture industry, unveiled its collaboration with Susan Cain, author of the international bestseller Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking.
While introverts may appear to be shy they actually prefer to be alone and may take longer to speak because they tend to process ideas internally first.
Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest that extroversion may facilitate the learning of spoken English, but that introverts have more patience and thus may excel in areas of pronunciation, reading, and writing [2].
Many introverts relied upon alcohol to "improve" their social skills.
The problem with this, Cain reports from extensive interviews with introverts, academic psychologists and therapists: Introversion has no cure.
Unlike us introverts, people probably don't mistake your shyness for snobbery or wonder why you need to be alone so often.
Introvert, who had become his sire's 18th winner when scoring his sole previous success in a Lingfield maiden in July, is out of the Japanese-bred Sunday Silence mare Isana.
The film is a tale of an introvert whose life changes after he receives a phone call.
A noisy, happy, crowded venue energizes an extrovert and enervates an introvert.
As Jonathon Rauch explains in a 2003 article in The Atlantic Monthly, I'm an introvert because I find other people tiring.