introvert


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introvert

 [in´tro-vert]
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

in·tro·vert

(in'trō-vert),
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others. Compare: extrovert.
2. To turn a structure into itself, to invert.

introvert

/in·tro·vert/ (in´tro-vert)
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

introvert

(ĭn′trə-vûrt′, ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
tr.v. intro·verted, intro·verting, intro·verts
1. To turn or direct inward.
2. Psychology To concentrate (one's interests) upon oneself.
3. Medicine To turn (a tubular organ or part) inward upon itself.
n. (ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
1. Psychology An introverted person.
2. Medicine An anatomical structure that is capable of being introverted.

introvert

[in′trəvurt]
Etymology: L, intro + vertere, to turn
1 n, a person whose interests are directed inward and who is shy, withdrawn, emotionally reserved, and self-absorbed.
2 v, to turn inward or to direct one's interests and thoughts toward oneself. Compare ambivert, extrovert. See also egocentric.

introvert

Psychiatry A person who is introspective, self-conscious, often meticulous, a poor social mixer, who takes criticism too seriously. Cf Extrovert.

in·tro·vert

(intrō-vĕrt)
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others.
Compare: extrovert
2. To turn a structure into itself.

introvert

A person whose tendency of mind is to look inwards, to contemplate his or her own thoughts, feelings and emotions rather than to seek social intercourse. The introvert is often OBSESSIVE, anxious, HYPOCHONDRIACAL and solitary, more concerned with thought than with action. Compare EXTROVERT.
References in periodicals archive ?
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Our goal in this study was to examine the effects of arousal, induced by cognitive activation, on introverts and extroverts in the context of follow-up tasks.
So, if you're an introvert struggling through your weekly all-hands updates, the problem may be with your office rather than you.