introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]

introjection

/in·tro·jec·tion/ (in″trah-jek´shun) a mental mechanism in which the standards and values of other persons or groups are unconsciously and symbolically taken within oneself.

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.

introjection

[-jek′shən]
Etymology: L, intro + jacere, to throw
an ego defense mechanism whereby an individual unconsciously incorporates into his own ego structure the qualities of another person, usually a significant other. It happens early in life and continues less intensely throughout.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
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References in periodicals archive ?
introjecting hallucinations, even while we are, according to one reading of the film, being enlisted against such debasing and dehumanizing practices.
Harvey misreads Cezanne's painting which is about voyeurism and the implications of Manet's painting, introjecting himself as the spectator not of a `prettified nude' but rather a recoiling and somewhat grotesque figure.
Introjecting a desire, a grief, a situation means channeling them through language into a communion of empty mouths.
By introjecting rather than incorporating trauma, Mary Shelley produces what I have elsewhere called a "textual abject.
Bypassing the use of this term by Melanie Klein and others, Abraham and Torok develop the Ferenczian view of introjection as the interiorization of a love object through an extension of auto-eroticism, an extension which enlarges and enriches the introjecting ego.