intravenous bolus

in·tra·ve·nous bo·lus

a relatively large volume of fluid or dose of a drug or test substance given intravenously and rapidly to hasten or magnify a response; in radiology, rapid injection of a large dose of contrast medium to increase opacification of blood vessels.

intravenous bolus

a relatively large dose of medication administered into a vein in a short period, usually within 1 to 30 minutes. The IV bolus is commonly used when rapid administration of a medication is needed, such as in an emergency; when drugs that cannot be diluted, such as many cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, are administered; and when the therapeutic purpose is to achieve a peak drug level in the bloodstream of the patient. The IV bolus is not used when the medication must be diluted in a large-volume parenteral fluid before entering the bloodstream or when the rapid administration of a medication, such as potassium chloride, may be life-threatening. The IV bolus is normally not used for patients who have decreased cardiac output, decreased urinary output, pulmonary congestion, or systemic edema. Such patients have decreased tolerance to medications, which therefore must be diluted more than usual and administered at slower rates. A wristwatch with a second hand is recommended for the timing of all IV bolus injections. The amount of medication to be delivered per minute is determined by dividing the total amount to be injected by the prescribed time for delivery. The IV bolus site is prepared with an appropriate antiseptic, and sterile technique is used to enter the site with a venipuncture needle. A winged-tip needle is used for administering an IV bolus because it is small enough to lessen the risk of collapsing the vein and causing trauma and is more stable than a syringe needle. If a primary IV line is already established, the IV bolus is administered by mixing the prescribed drug with the appropriate amount of diluent and then administering the drug into the primary line, after first determining whether it is compatible with the primary IV solution. Also called intravenous push.
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Administration of medication by intravenous bolus

in·tra·ve·nous bo·lus

(in'tră-vē'nŭs bō'lŭs)
1. A relatively large volume of fluid or dose of a drug or test substance given intravenously and rapidly to hasten or magnify a response.
2. radiology Rapid injection of a large dose of contrast medium to increase opacification of blood vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company's BD Intelliport(TM) System is the industry's first medication management system designed to overcome long-standing challenges associated with the administration of manual intravenous bolus injections.
In patients with STEMI who had successful reperfusion with primary or rescue PCI, a single intravenous bolus of epoetin alpha within 4 hours of PCI did not reduce infarct size and was associated with higher rates of adverse cardiovascular events (8).
She was given 20 mg of furosemide as an intravenous bolus.
When a diagnosis of dilutional EAHE is confirmed, the most appropriate and life-saving treatment strategy is prompt administration of an intravenous bolus of hypertonic saline.
She also received an intravenous bolus injection of Heparin, Aspirin 300mg, Clopidogrel 300mg and sublingual Glyceryl Trinitrate spray.
Historically a 10 IU intravenous bolus of oxytocin was given after caesarean delivery of the foetus.
These effects are especially noticeable when it is given as a rapid intravenous bolus at caesarean section to contract the uterus after delivery.
Dextrose 50% (D50) is often given as an intravenous bolus to patients who have hypoglycemia, but many of us have never been taught how to properly administer D50.
The pharmacodynamic effect (14) of thiopental varies with the method of administration, either by a single intravenous bolus (15) (such as is the case in lethal injection in almost all states) or by continuous intravenous infusion.
The adverse events are dose related and have been reported only in association with a large intravenous bolus of heparin.
WHO guidelines recommend an initial intravenous bolus dose of 250 mg of obidoxime followed by an infusion of 750 mg over 24 hours.
Patients in the enoxaparin arm who were younger than 75 years received a 30-mg intravenous bolus, followed by subcutaneous injections of 1.