intraabdominal infection

intraabdominal infection

[in′trə·abdom′inəl]
a disease caused by organisms, usually bacterial or fungal, situated within the cavity of the abdomen. The infection may be in the retroperitoneal space or the peritoneal cavity and can arise as a result of surgery. Intraperitoneal infections may be diffuse or localized in one or more abscesses in recesses such as the pelvic space or perihepatic spaces. Abscesses also form about diseased viscera. Treatment depends on the type of infectious organism and the site of the infection.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of at least two of the signs and symptoms including a temperature above 38[degrees]C that could not be explained otherwise, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and isolation of Candida species in surgical drain fluid culture was considered intraabdominal infection.
Relaparotomy in peritonitis: prognosis and treatment of patients with persisting intraabdominal infection.
Compared with laparotomy, it reduces the risk of intestinal fistulas, intraabdominal infection and the difficulty of postsurgical nursing care.
Intraabdominal infection was considered to be present when an ESBLE isolate was cultured from biliary fluid, from peritoneal fluid containing [greater than or equal to] 250 polymorphonuclear cells/[mm.
The facultative organisms most commonly isolated from intraabdominal infection are Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis.
Prospective randomized trials affect the outcomes of intraabdominal infection.
The potential hazards of drainages are the possibility of intra-peritoneal spillage and seeding of ovarian carcinoma and increased risk of intraabdominal infection, haemorrhage and adhesions.
Another 22 residents developed acute symptomatic nonpulmonary infections that were sufficiently severe to warrant a physician's evaluation for hospitalization; these included 10 cases of urosepsis, 7 soft tissue infections, and 2 cases of purulent sinusitis, as well as Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and intraabdominal infection.
In a study of patients with VRE infections, 600 mg of intravenous linezolid twice a day resulted in clinical cure rates in all 8 subjects with an intraabdominal infection, 9 of the 12 (75%) with bacteremia, 12 of the 13 (92%) with a urinary tract infection, 8 of 9(92%) with skin and soft-tissue infections, and both patients with pneumonia.
Site of infection accompanying the bacteremia was determined as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, meningitis, incisional wound infection, other soft tissue infection, intraabdominal infection, and primary bloodstream infection by using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions (16).
These nonpulmonary infections included 10 cases of urosepsis, 7 soft tissue infections, and 2 cases of purulent sinusitis, as well as Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and intraabdominal infection.

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