intra-abdominal hypertension


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intra-abdominal hypertension

Abbreviation: IAH
An increase in measured abdominal pressures, from a normal of 0 mm Hg to levels between 15 and 20 mm Hg. It may occur in patients with multiple traumatic injuries to the abdomen or with intraperitoneal diseases, e.g., severe pancreatitis. It is associated with the development of abdominal compartment syndrome, shock, and multiple organ failure.
See also: hypertension
References in periodicals archive ?
Results from the international conferenc of experts on intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome.
Most cases having raised IAP were having grade 1 or grade 2 intra-abdominal hypertension.
Intra-abdominal hypertension --implications for the intensive care physician.
Ivatury RR, Porter JM, Simon RJ, et al: Intra-abdominal hypertension after life-threatening penetrating abdominal trauma: Prophylaxis, incidence, and clinical relevance to gastric mucosal pH and abdominal compartment syndrome.
Intra-abdominal hypertension is an independent cause of postoperative renal impairment.
To assess the statistical agreement between TV, TG and TP pressure monitoring in a pneumoperitoneum and an intestinal obstruction intra-abdominal hypertension model at different IAPs.
Clinical relevance of intra-abdominal hypertension in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.
Prospective study of intra-abdominal hypertension and renal function after laparotomy.
As per the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome, a sustained intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) exceeding 12 mmHg was considered to be intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH).
Burst abdomen with impending intra-abdominal hypertension was the most common indication followed by "grossly edematous bowel" which made primary closure impossible.
Prompt measurement of intra-abdominal hypertension by either an IVC pressure catheter, or by bladder or intragastric pressure monitoring is essential, and if treatment is to be undertaken, the risk of decompressive laparotomy and an open abdomen in a moribund child on ECLS must be balanced against the anticipated reversibility of the primary disease process.