intolerance

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intolerance

 [in-tol´er-ans]
inability to withstand or consume; inability to absorb or metabolize nutrients.
activity intolerance a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which a person has insufficient physiological or psychological energy to endure or complete necessary or desired daily activities. Causes include generalized weakness, sedentary lifestyle, imbalance between oxygen supply and demand, and bed rest or immobility. Defining characteristics include verbal report of fatigue or weakness, abnormal heart rate or blood pressure response to activity, exertional discomfort, and dyspnea.
carbohydrate intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more carbohydrate(s), such as glucose, fructose, or one of the disaccharides.
disaccharide intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more disaccharide(s), usually due to deficiency of the corresponding disaccharidase(s), although it may have other causes such as impaired absorption. After ingestion of the disaccharide there may be abdominal symptoms such as diarrhea, flatulence, borborygmus, distention, and pain. One common type is lactose intolerance.
drug intolerance the state of reacting to the normal pharmacologic doses of a drug with the symptoms of overdosage.
exercise intolerance limitation of ability to perform work or exercise at normally accepted levels, as measured in exercise testing.
glucose intolerance inability to properly metabolize glucose, a type of carbohydrate intolerance; see diabetes mellitus.
lactose intolerance a disaccharide intolerance specific for lactose, usually due to an inherited deficiency of lactase activity in the intestinal mucosa.
risk for activity intolerance a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual is at risk of having insufficient physiological or psychological energy to endure or complete required daily activities. See also activity intolerance.
Patient Care. Nursing activities and interventions are aimed at identifying those factors that contribute to activity intolerance, providing evidence of the patient's progress to the higher level of activity possible for the patient, and reducing signs of physiologic intolerance to increased activity (blood pressure and respiratory and pulse rates). Once the contributing factors are identified, plans are made to avoid or minimize them. For example, if inadequate sleep or rest periods are a factor, the nurse plans with the patient scheduled periods of uninterrupted rest during the day. Inadequate sleep at night should be assessed and appropriate interventions planned and implemented. Making an objective record of the patient's progress toward increased activity tolerance can help alleviate depression or lack of incentive, both of which can be contributing factors. Such assessment data could include measurements of blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rates before and after an activity, gradual increase in the distance walked, and gradual resumption of responsibility for activities of daily living.

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns),
Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.

intolerance

/in·tol·er·ance/ (in-tol´er-ans) inability to withstand or consume; inability to absorb or metabolize nutrients.
congenital lysine intolerance  an inherited disorder due to a defect in the degradation of lysine, characterized by vomiting, rigidity, and coma, and high levels of ammonia, lysine, and arginine in the blood.
congenital sucrose intolerance  a disaccharide intolerance specific for sucrase, usually due to a congenital defect in the sucrase-isomaltase enzyme complex; see sucrase-isomaltase deficiency.
disaccharide intolerance  a complex of abdominal symptoms after ingestion of normal quantities of dietary carbohydrates, including diarrhea, flatulence, distention, and pain; it is usually due to deficiency of one or more disaccharidases but may be due to impaired absorption or other causes.
drug intolerance 
1. inability to continue taking, or difficulty in continuing to take, a medication because of an adverse side effect that is not immunity-mediated.
2. the state of reacting to the normal pharmacologic doses of a drug with the symptoms of overdosage.
hereditary fructose intolerance  an inherited disorder of fructose metabolism due to an enzymatic deficiency, with onset in infancy, characterized by hypoglycemia with variable manifestations of fructosuria, fructosemia, anorexia, vomiting, failure to thrive, jaundice, splenomegaly, and an aversion to fructose-containing foods.
lactose intolerance  a disaccharide intolerance specific for lactose, usually due to an inherited deficiency of lactase activity in the intestinal mucosa, which may not be manifest until adulthood. Congenital lactose i. may be due to an inherited immediate deficiency of lactase activity or may be a more severe disorder with vomiting, dehydration, failure to thrive, disacchariduria, and cataracts, probably due to abnormal permeability of the gastric mucosa.
lysinuric protein intolerance  a hereditary disorder of metabolism involving a defect in dibasic amino acid transport; characterized by growth retardation, episodic hyperammonemia, seizures, mental retardation, hepatomegaly, muscle weakness, and osteopenia; it can be treated with citrulline supplementation.

intolerance

(ĭn-tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being intolerant; lack of tolerance.
2. Medicine Inability to digest or metabolize a food, drug, or other substance or compound: lactose intolerance.

intolerance

[intol′ərəns]
Etymology: L, in, not, tolerare, to bear
a condition characterized by inability to absorb or metabolize a nutrient or medication. Exposure to the substance may cause an adverse reaction, as in lactose intolerance. Compare allergy, atopic.

intolerance

Medtalk
1. Extreme discomfort with a particular environmental condition. See Cold intolerance, Heat intolerance.
2. Inability to metabolize or excrete a particular substance. See Food intolerance, Hereditary fructose intolerance, Lactose intolerance, Milk intolerance, Orthostatic intolerance.

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.
2. Incapacity for enduring or the effects of specific medications.

intolerance

A tendency to react adversely to stimuli of any kind or to drugs or foodstuffs.

intolerance

impaired or abnormal reaction to ingested or administered substance

intolerance,

n undesirable response to a substance (i.e., food, allergen, or remedy) or conditions. See also aggravation, idiosyncrasy, and tolerance.

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns)
Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.

intolerance,

n inability to endure or withstand.

intolerance

inability to withstand or consume; inability to absorb or metabolize nutrients.

drug intolerance
the state of reacting to the normal pharmacological doses of a drug with the signs of overdosage.

Patient discussion about intolerance

Q. What is the difference between intolerance and allergy? Is there any point in which intolerance to a certain food (say milk or eggs for example) turns into an allergy or are they totally unrelated? Is intolerance showing up only as digestion problems and not other allergy symptoms? Can you mistakenly interpret intolerance as allergy in blood tests or vice versa?

A. Webmd.com has an article that will give you some insights on the matter
See link bellow.

http://www.webmd.com/allergies/foods-allergy-intolerance

Q. can you be lactose intolerant just in the morning? if i drink milk or eat a dairy product in the morning i get nausous, vomit and have diarehha. but i eat dairy products in the evening and im fine. is it possible to be lactose intolerant just in the morning?

A. Not that I'm aware of.. You are either lactose intolerant or you're not. However, it depends on how much dairy products you eat, and perhaps you consume more dairy products in the morning, on an empty stomach, where it all absorbs, where as in the evening you might eat less and combine it with other food. I would suggest you dicrease the total amount of dairy you eat, in order to get rid of these symptms.

Q. lactose intolerant If you are lactose intolerant and you consume a dairy related product can it cause a fever?

A. No
Lactose Intolerance means you lack the enzyme to digest milk.
You get diarrhea NOT fever
DrMDK

More discussions about intolerance
References in classic literature ?
How intolerable even these might have been would be apparent if an inferior poet were to treat the subject.
But coming to the other point--where a leading citizen becomes the prince of his country, not by wickedness or any intolerable violence, but by the favour of his fellow citizens--this may be called a civil principality: nor is genius or fortune altogether necessary to attain to it, but rather a happy shrewdness.
His companions seemed ever to play intolerable parts.
They have a sharp, shrewish look, which I do not like at all; and in her air altogether there is a self-sufficiency without fashion, which is intolerable.
exclaimed she, a sense of intolerable humiliation triumphing over her agony and fear.
Our friend Charley, after disturbing the household with beat of drum and riotous shouts, races up and down the staircase, overturning of chairs, and much other uproar, began to feel the quiet and confinement within doors intolerable.
But this resolution had been an immense effort--he trembled at the thought of seeing her changed face, as a timid woman trembles at the thought of the surgeon's knife, and he chose now to bear the long hours of suspense rather than encounter what seemed to him the more intolerable agony of witnessing her trial.
It was now the height of summer, and these naked plains would be intolerable to the traveller were it not for the breezes which swept over them during the fervor of the day, bringing with them tempering airs from the distant mountains.
When I had fully satisfied him on this head, he sighed deeply, as if relieved of some intolerable burden, and went on to talk, with what I thought a cruel calmness, of various points of speculative philosophy, which had heretofore formed subject of discussion between us.
Not even the shadow of a doubt was ever suggested; and Samuel made an intolerable misuse of the first person plural:
If, seized by an intolerable boredom, he had determined to be a painter merely to break with irksome ties, it would have been comprehensible, and commonplace; but commonplace is precisely what I felt he was not.
Philip reddened, feeling his own spruceness an intolerable reproach; for of late he had begun to pay some attention to his toilet, and he had come out from England with a pretty selection of ties.