intertarsal joint

in·ter·tar·sal joint

(ĭn′tər-tär′səl)
n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The anatomy of the intertarsal joint and its function in locomotion was studied by Schaller et al.
The intertarsal joint of the ostrich (Struthio camelus): anatomical examination and function of passive structures in locomotion.
On physical examination, the bird was quiet, was nonweight-bearing on the left leg, and had increased edema of the left foot to the level of the left intertarsal joint.
Dermatitis was also noted around the intertarsal joint.
Radiographs showed bilateral intertarsal joint osteoarthritis and a healed ulnar fracture.
Intertarsal joint problems are commonly diagnosed in cranes at this center, and most are traumatic in nature.
Uric acid concentrations determined for the kidneys, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, and scrapings from the pericardial sack (20 mg) and intertarsal joint (2 mg) were, respectively, 12,200, 200, 110, 20,700, and 43,000 mg/100 g tissue.
Arthritis was experimentally induced via intra-articular injection of microcrystalline sodium urate suspension (MSU) into 1 intertarsal joint.
Intra- and interobserver variation was less than 7% for all stifle and intertarsal joint measurements but frequently exceeded 10% for the hip-joint measurements.
is a major shock-absorbing joint, because in coordination with the intertarsal joints it determines the distribution of forces upon the skeleton and soft tissues of the foot.
Bilateral swelling of the plantar regions and moderately swollen intertarsal joints were visible in 1 bird, with purulent exudate indicating septic arthritis and pododermatitis.
is a major shock absorbing joint, because in coordination with the intertarsal joints it determines the distribution of forces upon the skeleton and soft tissues of the foot.