intersectoral collaboration

intersectoral collaboration

(ĭn-tĕr-sĕk′tĕr-ĭl) [″ + sector]
Cooperation among different social groups that enables them to solve common problems, e.g., a public health crisis.
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viii) Mechanisms will be developed for intersectoral collaboration for mental health, led by the health sector and engaging a range of other sectors.
Promote intersectoral collaboration at national, regional, and international levels; engage civil society, unions, and other health worker organizations and the private sector; and align international cooperation to support investments in the health workforce, as part of national health and education strategies and plans.
These activities include identifying priority issues that affect different sectors at different levels, developing monitoring systems that incorporate HiAP/SDG-sensitive indicators, improving the evidence base for approaches to intersectoral collaboration, mapping and developing thematic websites, training HiAP and SDG policy decision-makers, and providing activities designed to train trainers.
In particular, it talks about the importance for systems policies, public health policies and policies in other sectors that affect health, to support universal coverage, effective service delivery (particularly primary care), health promotion, illness prevention and intersectoral collaboration.
Indeed, in a complementary comment, Alleyne made an important distinction between multisectoral and intersectoral collaboration in relation to our paper.
the challenges of intersectoral collaboration within and across governments and civil society organizations; (6,7)
It underscored the need for a change in mind-set from the traditional preoccupation with combining the use of only a few limited vector control methods, such as LLINs and IRS, to a comprehensive strategy with key elements that include integration of chemical and nonchemical methods of vector control and their further integration with other aspects of a country's health-care system, evidence-based decision making, intersectoral collaboration, advocacy and social mobilization, and capacity building.
Indeed, as most of the socio-economic conditions in which people are born, live and work, commonly referred as the social determinants of health, are outside the health sector realm, intersectoral collaboration emerges as the strategy of choice to act on those determinants (3).
On the one hand governments need new competencies to tap the potential within intersectoral collaboration such as intermediary agencies.
Approaches like Health in All Policies (HiAP) conceptualize the inclusion of SDH through intersectoral collaboration (Scott-Samuel, 2005).
There is a need for intersectoral collaboration, nationwide approach, and responsibility of local authorities in the issue of public health strengthening.
Examples of cases in psychiatry where intersectoral collaboration is central include: community-based residential and psycho-social rehabilitation facilities and services; forensic psychiatry; substance abuse and addiction; [31,32] child and adolescent psychiatry, and geriatric psychiatry.
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