internist

(redirected from internists)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

internist

 [in-ter´nist]
a specialist in internal medicine.

in·tern·ist

(in-ter'nist, in'ter-nist),
A physician trained in internal medicine.

internist

/in·tern·ist/ (in-ter´nist) a specialist in internal medicine.

internist

(ĭn-tûr′nĭst)
n.
A physician specializing in internal medicine.

internist

[intur′nist, in′turnist]
Etymology: L, internus, inward
a physician who specializes in internal medicine.

internist

Medtalk A practitioner of general medicine is certified by the Am Board of Internal Medicine–ABIM, who has had 3 yrs of formal training in internal medicine. Cf Family practitioner, Intern.

in·tern·ist

(in-tĕr'nist)
A physician trained in internal medicine.

internist

(USA) a physician who specializes in the study and treatment of non-surgical diseases in adults. A specialist in internal medicine.

internist

a specialist in internal medicine.

internist program
a postgraduate training program suitable for an internist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Milwaukee and his colleagues found no significant difference between MOC-required internists and grandfathered internists in 10 primary care measures in a population of 68,213 patients at four VA medical centers from 2012 to 2013 (JAMA 2014;312:2358-63).
Approximately 54% of internists and family physicians reported that time constraints prevented them from doing full-body skin exams more frequently, compared with 31% of dermatologists.
gyns, believed that HT has benefit in the prevention of colon cancer, less than half of internists or family physicians believed this.
We have helped some of the busiest general internists in our medical center by removing some of their most demanding patients, who take extra time with excessive questions and requests.
Family physicians and general internists were the only specialists included in our study, as other primary care physicians are not generally accessible to all ages and both sexes of patients.
Ellwood highlights his work with the Jackson Hole Group, whose objective is to formulate improved ways to deliver medical care, and the need for internists to play a larger role in structuring managed care.
The purpose of the present study was to examine anti-hypertensive drug-prescribing practices of internists and family physicians prior to the publication of the 1988 treatment guidelines to determine the extent to which these physicians individualized step 1 therapy based upon patient age, race, and coexisting disease.
The webinar is led by an expert at turning internists into great speakers, Debbie Fay, and focuses on:
In 2011, the median compensation for the 4,083 general internists responding to the survey was $215,689, compared with $205,379 in 2010.
Family physicians provided a higher proportional level of care to poor, near-poor, low-income, and publicly insured patients than did general internists, surgical specialists, other medical specialists, nurse practitioners, or physician assistants.
First, general internists see fewer patients per unit of time than family physicians.