interior

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in·te·ri·or

(in-tēr'ē-ŏr),
Relating to the inside; situated within.

interior

[in·tēr′ē·ər]
Etymology: L, inner
1 situated inside; inward.
2 an inner part or cavity.

interior

[L. internus, within]
The internal portion or area of something; situated within.
References in periodicals archive ?
At some time in the distant and unremembered past, we or our evolutionary ancestors developed spoken language, and at some later point we interiorized speech, which became a new form of thought and the basis of a new form of consciousness.
But the process of analogy this entails will not be successful if one has not interiorized the habits enabling one to prepare foods well.
Told in an often radically interiorized manner, in long sentences (many of nine to eleven lines), this multigenerational, international novel is a complex house of mirrors; its intertwined, fragmented stories reflect, echo, invert, and interplay upon one another and concern the obsessions, traps, and illusions of desire.
These have now been assimilated and interiorized for several generations.
For a long time, probably since the West interiorized the French Revolution's invention that state sovereignty and power should be founded on popular majorities, social knowledge has been constructed on a double misunderstanding.
Inside this closet, Hawarden imagined and developed her interiorized secret: pictures of same-sex erotic desire, an inner secret that may have been a secret to herself as well.
Dangerous Virtues is a collection of five stories that alternates between interiorized semi-realism and Calvino-like fancy, exploring themes of isolation and disconnection between the protagonists and the world around them.
3) This interiorized self is afflicted by what Alfred North Whitehead calls a "misplacement of reality"; that is, ideas and abstractions about reality are mistaken for actual reality.
Her "portrait" is produced through exteriorized action rather than through interiorized psychological conflict.
Arnold Krupat, writing on Native American autobiography, glosses Jane Faijins' distinction between: 'person as bounded entity invested with specific patterns of social behavior, normative powers, and restraints, and the individual as an entity with interiorized conscience, feelings, goals, motivations and aspirations.
That is, patriarchy, colonialism, and class dominance share the concept of the privatized individual for whom the political contents of daily life are interiorized as "consciousness" and thus made inaccessible to critique or resistance, and gender, specifically femininity, has been the essential link between discourses of dominance.
After almost 2500 years of interiorized psychological events, anyone who attempts to exteriorize them faces a tough road.