interdigital neuroma

interdigital neuroma

trauma-induced peripheral entrapment neuropathy of an interdigital nerve (interdigital nerve trauma is associated with excess or compensatory foot pronation); characterized by spasmodic pain and paraesthesia in distal tissues subserved by the traumatized nerve; nerve changes include local degeneration, fusiform thickening and juxtaneural fibrosis (see Table 1)
Table 1: Presentations of nerve trunk irritation in the foot
Neuroma/lesionInvolved nerveLocation
Proximal tarsal tunnel syndromeBranches of the posterior tibial nerveMedial ankle area
Distal tarsal tunnel syndrome Jogger's footMedial plantar nerveBetween navicular tuberosity and belly of abductor hallucis
Distal tarsal tunnel syndrome Baxter's neuritisLateral plantar nerveBetween bellies of abductor hallucis, quadratus plantae and abductor digiti quinti minimi
Joplin's neuromaMedial plantar nerve properMedial area of first metatarsal head
Houser's neuromaFirst plantar intermetatarsal nerveBetween 1 and 2 metatarsals
Heuter's neuromaSecond plantar intermetatarsal nerveBetween 2 and 3 metatarsals
Morton's neuromaThird plantar intermetatarsal nerveBetween 3 and 4 metatarsals
Islen's neuromaFourth plantar intermetatarsal nerveBetween 4 and 5 metatarsals
References in periodicals archive ?
Interdigital neuroma in the foot, generally known as Morton's neuroma, is a painful condition that produces neuropathic pain in the distribution of the affected interdigital nerve [1].
Here, we report a case of interdigital neuroma in the second intermetatarsal space accompanied with MTP joint instability of the second and third toes due to plantar plate rupture.
The taping was not continued for over a month by the patient because of discomfort; therefore, surgical treatment with excision of the interdigital neuroma and plantar plate repair was offered to the patient.
The histopathology result reported neural fibrosis, which was consistent with an interdigital neuroma.
Open neurectomy for interdigital neuroma is the most common procedure in patients with persistent symptoms unresponsive to the conservative treatment; however, some patients complain of continued forefoot pain even after the procedure.
Several theories have been advocated as etiologies of interdigital neuroma including the chronic repetitive trauma theory, entrapment theory, ischemic theory, and intermetatarsal bursitis theory [22].
When MTP joint instability and interdigital neuroma coexist, it is not easy to confirm which pathology produces the patient's chief complaint.
We reported a case of interdigital neuroma in the second intermetatarsal space which could be attributed to the MTP joint instability.
Bloome, "Concurrent interdigital neuroma and MTP joint instability: long-term results of treatment," Foot & Ankle International, vol.
Ultrasound-guided Interdigital Neuroma Injections: Short-term Clinical Outcomes after a Single Percutaneous InjectionPreliminary Results.
Occurrence of two interdigital neuromas in one foot.