intemperance


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in·tem·per·ance

(in-tem'pĕr-ăns),
Lack of proper self-control, usually in reference to the use of alcoholic beverages. Compare: incontinence (2).
[L. intemperantia, fr. in-, neg. + temperantia, moderation]

intemperance

[intem′pərəns]
Etymology: L, in, not, temperare, to moderate
excessive indulgence in eating, drinking, or other lifestyle functions.

intemperance

Lack of restraint in personal indulgence in any activity, such as alcoholic consumption, likely to be harmful in excess.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been interpreted to favor intemperance, slavery, capital punishment, and the subjection of women.
Preemptive action is necessary in the face of clear and present danger to the public, but intemperance rarely poses such danger--thus, the notorious ineffectiveness of such laws.
When Aristotle writes about vice as a disposition to choose what promotes a certain conception of the good, and especially when he is distinguishing between intemperance and weakness, one cannot but be struck by the similarity between virtue and vice.
Wine and liquors were kept in rooms, intemperance, gambling and licentiousness were common.
For example, a report written for an earlier incarnation of Hartly's AICP listed the nine causes of nine-tenths of the poverty in New York City: ignorance, idleness, intemperance, extravagance, imprudence, gambling, theft, prostitution, and dependency.
I have been assured by the GSEs that the intemperance and hyperbole that sometimes marked discussion of this issue last year will not reoccur.
Bush's favorite dessert is chocolate intemperance, a rich brownie wrapped around chocolate mousse and covered in chocolate cream.
It is therefore not insignificant that Douglass spoke against intemperance and for women's rights frequently as part of his anti-slavery lectures.
In recent times, epidemiological research has transformed venerable moral vices such as sloth, gluttony, intemperance, and fornication into medical risk factors--sedentary lifestyle, obesity, alcoholism, and unsafe sex.
On the one hand, Eddy became convinced that the deadliest foes that confronted the Allied armies were not German troops but intemperance and impurity.
As Prospero's victim, Caliban is proof of the monarch's tyranny; as Prospero's political counterpart, however, Caliban demonstrates the source of tyranny in intemperance.
0] increases or lowers the effect of [epsilon] on the producer's marginal utility depending on whether the producer exhibits temperance, u'''' [less than] 0, or intemperance, u'''' [greater than or equal to] 0.