intemperance


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in·tem·per·ance

(in-tem'pĕr-ăns),
Lack of proper self-control, usually in reference to the use of alcoholic beverages. Compare: incontinence (2).
[L. intemperantia, fr. in-, neg. + temperantia, moderation]

intemperance

[intem′pərəns]
Etymology: L, in, not, temperare, to moderate
excessive indulgence in eating, drinking, or other lifestyle functions.

intemperance

Lack of restraint in personal indulgence in any activity, such as alcoholic consumption, likely to be harmful in excess.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, as historians have argued, the significance of the bottle metaphor and other tropes of temperance express anxieties that are not limited to intemperance (Epstein 1981, 100-103).
Yet despite the Church's history in campaigning against intemperance, the monks of Buckfast have taken a vow of silence.
The second part of the vision was a corollary to the first, but addressed the entire church and would have far-reaching consequences: All Adventists were enjoined by God to "come out against intemperance of every kind,--intemperance in working, in eating, in drinking, and in drugging.
I do know that the mayor has been known to express himself over-floridly in the past, and I apologize for not being familiar with his specific intemperance of phrase on this subject.
It was a casual conversation that ended ugly, but John Galliano paid the price for his intemperance and bigotry due to France's hate speech laws.
In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Noda warned China s intemperance could damage its economy and its effects may be felt further afield.
Far from guiding their young to behave courteously and responsibly, they showed thoughtlessness and intemperance.
The communist Friedrich Engels was shocked at "the extent of intemperance among the workers of England", and, with it, "the frightful shattering of mental and physical health, the ruin of all domestic relations".
We follow her as she goes from trusting this man to suspecting him of lying to finding parallels between his life and her own," explains Nunnery, whose previous work includes Intemperance, which premiered at the Everyman in 2007.
China is certainly showing an escalating intemperance which bodes extremely ill for the future of water management in India, particularly of Brahmaputra which originates like several other rivers of India in Tibet.
In the Commons, Keneally's intemperance condemned him to virtual ostracism and electoral defeat shortly before his death in 1880.
Walsh explained that the only allusion to advising local boys to leave Clinton was at the very end of his talk, when he recalled to the boys that "most of the intemperance was due to associations, and that there was no cure as long as the companionship entered into through drink was continued; give up your companionship and strike out for yourselves.