intelligence


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Related to intelligence: intelligence test, military intelligence

intelligence

 [in-tel´ĭ-jens]
the ability to comprehend or understand. It is basically a combination of reasoning, memory, imagination, and judgment; each of these faculties relies upon the others. Intelligence is not an entity within a person but a combination of cognitive skills and knowledge made evident by behaviors that are adaptive.

In speaking of general intelligence, authorities often distinguish between a number of different kinds of basic mental ability. One of these is verbal aptitude, the ability to understand the meaning of words and to use them effectively in writing or speaking. Another is skill with numbers, the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide and to use these skills in problems. The capacity to work with spatial relationships, that is, with visualizing how objects take up space, is still another (for example, how two triangles can fit together to make a square). Perception, memory, and reasoning may also be considered different basic abilities.

These abilities are the ones that are usually examined by intelligence tests. There are others, however, that may be as important or more important. Determination and perseverance make intelligence effective and useful. Artistic talent, such as proficiency in art or music, and creativity, the ability to use thought and imagination to produce original ideas, are difficult to measure but are certainly part of intelligence.
intelligence quotient (I.Q.) a numerical expression of intellectual capacity obtained by multiplying the mental age of the subject, ascertained by testing, by 100 and dividing by his or her chronologic age.
intelligence test a set of problems or tasks posed to assess an individual's innate ability to judge, comprehend, and reason.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jens),
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in relation to the extent of one's perceived effectiveness in meeting challenges.
2. In psychology, a person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, measured intelligence and effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.
[L. intelligentia]

intelligence

[intel′ijəns]
Etymology: L, intelligentia, perception
1 the potential ability to acquire, retain, and apply experience, understanding, knowledge, reasoning, and judgment in coping with new experiences and in solving problems.
2 the manifestation of such ability. See also intelligence quotient. intelligent, adj.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in meeting challenges and solving problems.
2. psychology A person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, those that measured intelligence and the effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.

intelligence

A group of separate, but correlated, abilities, such as memory, speed of perception of relationships, verbal skills, numerical skills and visuo-spatial perception, each of which is present to a varying degree. There is no single entity which may be described as raw, undifferentiated intelligence. The IQ (INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENT), which attempts to quantify these abilities, generally equates well with scholastic performance and with subsequent success in business or professional life, but a severe deficiency in motivation may nullify a high IQ.

intelligence

the ability to understand and create abstract ideas. Tests to measure intelligence are rather unreliable since it is not possible to separate completely environmental influences (such as schooling and social background) from innate ability. Nevertheless, such tests are widely used, producing a measure called the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) which is:

actual age Thus, if a person has an average mental age for his age-group he will have an I.Q. score of 100. The HERITABILITY of intelligence is thought to be between 0.5 and 0.7.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment.

intelligence,

n mental potential or capacity; an individual's total repertoire of problem-solving and cognitive discrimination responses that are usual and expected at a given age level and in the large population unit; that which is measured by an intelligence test.
intelligence dental, quotient,
n an estimated appraisal of a patient's knowledge and appreciation of dental services.
intelligence quotient (IQ),
n an estimate of intelligence level; an index determined by dividing the mental age in months by the chronologic age in months and multiplying the result by 100. Thus the IQ of a child of 100 months with a mental age of 110 months would be 110.

intelligence

1. the ability to comprehend or understand.
2. information gathered about the state of affairs in a farming system, a disease occurrence study, a public health survey or a veterinary service.
References in periodicals archive ?
Goss, who was a devoted ally of the White House, and an unabashed defender of the Iraq war, "brought with him to Langley a Praetorian Guard from the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence," reported the January 4, 2005 Washington Post.
The role of the FIG, in part, is to help make sense of intelligence, thereby assisting state and local police in their own analysis.
And that was the problem for Barakova, whose interest lay with understanding the basis for human intelligence rather than with creating robots born of science fiction.
Criticisms such as the irrelevance of the subjects tested, adverse impact issues involving gender and race, and significantly declining test scores as candidates get older and more removed from academic problem-solving have led to a situation in which intelligence testing is almost never used with an executive population.
I served previously as director of DIA [Defense Intelligence Agency], and for four years on the NSA [National Security Agency] Advisory Board after I retired.
The agency joined the rest of the intelligence community in greatly overestimating Iraq's chemical and biological weapons capability.
If by reconstructing our views of children's intelligence we can successfully teach a wider range of students, teachers should not be accused of being confused for doing just that.
According the Dictionary of Computing and Digital Media, artificial intelligence is "software that makes decisions based on accumulated experience and information," and uses functions "such as learning, adapting, reasoning and self-correcting.
Your verbal intelligence, also known as "word smarts" and "linguistic intelligence," is the brain system responsible for everything to do with words.
Physicians and business management experts are now reporting that the theory of emotional intelligence answers questions they've never been able to answer before.
Sitting in a wheelchair at the White House, the president said Tenet had strong ties to Congress from his days as staff director of the Senate Intelligence Committee from 1989 through 1992, a record of serving Clinton as director of intelligence programs at the National Security Council in 1993 and 1994, and support inside the halls of the CIA from his tenure as second in command.

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