intelligence


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Related to intelligence: intelligence test, military intelligence

intelligence

 [in-tel´ĭ-jens]
the ability to comprehend or understand. It is basically a combination of reasoning, memory, imagination, and judgment; each of these faculties relies upon the others. Intelligence is not an entity within a person but a combination of cognitive skills and knowledge made evident by behaviors that are adaptive.

In speaking of general intelligence, authorities often distinguish between a number of different kinds of basic mental ability. One of these is verbal aptitude, the ability to understand the meaning of words and to use them effectively in writing or speaking. Another is skill with numbers, the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide and to use these skills in problems. The capacity to work with spatial relationships, that is, with visualizing how objects take up space, is still another (for example, how two triangles can fit together to make a square). Perception, memory, and reasoning may also be considered different basic abilities.

These abilities are the ones that are usually examined by intelligence tests. There are others, however, that may be as important or more important. Determination and perseverance make intelligence effective and useful. Artistic talent, such as proficiency in art or music, and creativity, the ability to use thought and imagination to produce original ideas, are difficult to measure but are certainly part of intelligence.
intelligence quotient (I.Q.) a numerical expression of intellectual capacity obtained by multiplying the mental age of the subject, ascertained by testing, by 100 and dividing by his or her chronologic age.
intelligence test a set of problems or tasks posed to assess an individual's innate ability to judge, comprehend, and reason.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jens),
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in relation to the extent of one's perceived effectiveness in meeting challenges.
2. In psychology, a person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, measured intelligence and effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.
[L. intelligentia]

intelligence

[intel′ijəns]
Etymology: L, intelligentia, perception
1 the potential ability to acquire, retain, and apply experience, understanding, knowledge, reasoning, and judgment in coping with new experiences and in solving problems.
2 the manifestation of such ability. See also intelligence quotient. intelligent, adj.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in meeting challenges and solving problems.
2. psychology A person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, those that measured intelligence and the effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.

intelligence

A group of separate, but correlated, abilities, such as memory, speed of perception of relationships, verbal skills, numerical skills and visuo-spatial perception, each of which is present to a varying degree. There is no single entity which may be described as raw, undifferentiated intelligence. The IQ (INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENT), which attempts to quantify these abilities, generally equates well with scholastic performance and with subsequent success in business or professional life, but a severe deficiency in motivation may nullify a high IQ.

intelligence

the ability to understand and create abstract ideas. Tests to measure intelligence are rather unreliable since it is not possible to separate completely environmental influences (such as schooling and social background) from innate ability. Nevertheless, such tests are widely used, producing a measure called the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) which is:

actual age Thus, if a person has an average mental age for his age-group he will have an I.Q. score of 100. The HERITABILITY of intelligence is thought to be between 0.5 and 0.7.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment.

intelligence,

n mental potential or capacity; an individual's total repertoire of problem-solving and cognitive discrimination responses that are usual and expected at a given age level and in the large population unit; that which is measured by an intelligence test.
intelligence dental, quotient,
n an estimated appraisal of a patient's knowledge and appreciation of dental services.
intelligence quotient (IQ),
n an estimate of intelligence level; an index determined by dividing the mental age in months by the chronologic age in months and multiplying the result by 100. Thus the IQ of a child of 100 months with a mental age of 110 months would be 110.

intelligence

1. the ability to comprehend or understand.
2. information gathered about the state of affairs in a farming system, a disease occurrence study, a public health survey or a veterinary service.
References in classic literature ?
Only a very few days more - appallingly few to the hearts which had set themselves bravely to hope against hope - three weeks, a month later, perhaps, the name of ships under the blight of the "Overdue" heading shall appear again in the column of "Shipping Intelligence," but under the final declaration of "Missing.
By a species of vocal telegraph the intelligence reaches the inmost recesses of the vale in an inconceivably short space of time, drawing nearly its whole population down to the beach laden with every variety of fruit.
The warrior band departed for their village, which was about twenty miles distant, to collect objects of traffic; they left six or eight of their number, however, to keep watch upon the white men, and scouts were continually passing to and fro with intelligence.
Wealth and station, added to these, soon floated her upward, and for years now my Lady Dedlock has been at the centre of the fashionable intelligence and at the top of the fashionable tree.
In fact, from the origin of things down to the fifteenth century of the Christian era, inclusive, architecture is the great book of humanity, the principal expression of man in his different stages of development, either as a force or as an intelligence.
There is no defence or security for any of us except in the highest intelligence and development of all.
In truth, we have had instances of workmen, who, through long, large, [108] devoted study of the handiwork of the past, have done the thing better, with a more fully enlightened consciousness, with full intelligence of what those early workmen only guessed at.
Look at the intelligence of him," Scott went on hastily.
Crayford looked, where she always looked, at the column devoted to the Latest Intelligence from foreign parts.
The Man contended that he and his fellows were stronger than lions by reason of their greater intelligence.
For an instant he seemed to see this unnatural contest between a dead intelligence and a breathing mechanism only as a spectator--such fancies are in dreams; then he regained his identity almost as if by a leap forward into his body, and the straining automaton had a directing will as alert and fierce as that of its hideous antagonist.
I came to the conclusion that I was a fool, lower in the scale of intelligence than even the police of the modern romancer.

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