intellection

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intellection

The act or process of performing a mental act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, for the Perceptible, I understand seeing, tasting, hearing, feeling [9], imagining, (13) remembering; it is not necessary to speak of others such, just as it is not necessary also to speak of the Intellective Soul, since it isn't relevant to this purpose of the voice.
Unlike intellective variables, nonintellective variables are more context-specific and through meta-cognitive processes can be more easily adjusted (e.
On the other hand, if we ascribe instead the principle of thinking to the intellect or the intellective soul alone, as Aquinas appears to have done in his argument for the immortality of the soul, then we seem to threaten the natural unity of human soul and body as a hylomorphic compound.
ACA's deeply researched, groundbreaking catalogue of youth development and 21st-century learning skills makes clear that American summer camps are the products of intentional and intellective influences that should be embraced, perhaps more so than we do.
Reflective and intellective position papers on Mathematics Education Issues, Abuja: Marvelous Mike Ventures Ltd.
In addition to those who considered Kelly's approach overly intellective, some complained about what might be called an embarrassment of riches.
We designed the work sessions through a series of trials, selecting from McGrath's task circumflex model task types which could be individually performed: Intellective tasks and creative tasks, the last operationalized through a brainstorming exercise (McGrath, 1984).
Usually where there is a "middle term" there is mediation and thus no immediacy, since for Kierkegaard mediation implies an intellective endeavor, the positing of a middle term.
On the following six screens, six middle managers each from a different division of the company presented participants with a problem taken from real-life work situations, three trials of intellective nature and three of a creative nature.
In the cognitive domain, thinking/head, the emphasis is on remembering or reproducing something which has presumably been learned, as well as objectives which involve the solving of some intellective task for which the individual has to determine the essential problem and then reorder given material or combine it with ideas, methods, or procedures previously learned.
Considered in themselves, the intellectual virtues are more excellent than the moral virtues because they pertain to the intellective aspect of the agent while the moral virtues regulate the passions that belong to the sensitive aspect.