intellect


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intellect

 [in´tĕ-lekt]
the mind, thinking faculty, or understanding.

intellect

/in·tel·lect/ (in´tĭ-lekt) the mind, thinking faculty, or understanding.

intellect

[in′təlekt]
Etymology: L, intellectus, perception
1 the power and ability of the mind for knowing and understanding, as contrasted with feeling or with willing.
2 a person possessing a great capacity for thought and knowledge. intellectual, adj., n.

intellect

the mind, thinking faculty, or understanding. Not a highly developed function in animals.
References in classic literature ?
It dawned upon her gradually that the world was being picked to pieces, and put together on new and, according to the talkers, on infinitely better principles than before, that religion was in a fair way to be reasoned into nothingness, and intellect was to be the only God.
The original and more potent causes, however, lay in the rare perfection of his animal nature, the moderate proportion of intellect, and the very trifling admixture of moral and spiritual ingredients; these latter qualities, indeed, being in barely enough measure to keep the old gentleman from walking on all-fours.
They are the sublimest recreation of the intellect.
After apologizing for his ignorance, and reminding the audience that slav- ery was a poor school for the human intellect and heart, he proceeded to narrate some of the facts in his own history as a slave, and in the course of his speech gave utterance to many noble thoughts and thrilling reflections.
He had reached the age of sixteen then, I think, and without having bad features, or being deficient in intellect, he contrived to convey an impression of inward and outward repulsiveness that his present aspect retains no traces of.
Micawber, smiling, in another burst of confidence, 'it is an intellect capable of getting up the classics to any extent.
If he should turn to and beat her, he may possibly get the strength on his side; if it should be a question of intellect, he certainly will not.
Sometimes this was the effect of art, and chiefly of the art of literature, which dealt immediately with the passions and the intellect.
But, as has been frequently observed in the course of this great history, he only talked nonsense when he touched on chivalry, and in discussing all other subjects showed that he had a clear and unbiassed understanding; so that at every turn his acts gave the lie to his intellect, and his intellect to his acts; but in the case of these second counsels that he gave Sancho he showed himself to have a lively turn of humour, and displayed conspicuously his wisdom, and also his folly.
Such a birth requires, as its antecedents, not only a series of carefully arranged intermarriages, but also a long, continued exercise of frugality and self-control on the part of the would-be ancestors of the coming Equilateral, and a patient, systematic, and continuous development of the Isosceles intellect through many generations.
I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been.
But to exercise the intellect the prince should read histories, and study there the actions of illustrious men, to see how they have borne themselves in war, to examine the causes of their victories and defeat, so as to avoid the latter and imitate the former; and above all do as an illustrious man did, who took as an exemplar one who had been praised and famous before him, and whose achievements and deeds he always kept in his mind, as it is said Alexander the Great imitated Achilles, Caesar Alexander, Scipio Cyrus.