insular

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insular

 [in´su-lar]
pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islets of Langerhans.

in·su·lar

(in'sū-lăr),
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.

insular

/in·su·lar/ (-sdbobr-ler) pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islands of Langerhans.

insular

(ĭn′sə-lər, ĭns′yə-)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or constituting an island.
b. Living or located on an island.
2.
a. Suggestive of the isolated life of an island: "He is an exceedingly insular man, so deeply private as to seem inaccessible to the scrutiny of a novelist" (Leonard Michaels).
b. Circumscribed and detached in outlook and experience; narrow or provincial.
3. Anatomy Of or relating to isolated tissue or an island of tissue.

in′su·lar·ism, in′su·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
in′su·lar·ly adv.

in·su·lar

(in'sŭ-lăr)
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.

insular

pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islands of Langerhans.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Wordsworth has the last word in this titularly Kantian section of the book, and Eldridge's concluding essay on this most insularly situated of English poets discloses that the dominant drift of his thinking is the Cavellian intuition that philosophy turns to and into the utterly specific expressive performances of the literary as a way of becoming truer to itself, a way of returning to its senses.
An old tourist brochure, "The Story of Ramona's Marriage Place," stumbles deafly and insularly upon this matter:
It means that despite having to accept the risks of the unforeseeable, this product of years of research and thoughtful reflection nevertheless endeavors to keep the literary histories of Finnish and Finland-Swedish literatures alive among what Schoolfield rather insularly terms "an American public.
41) Thus Blacks were cast as outside the insularly defined sphere of the nation, as "dark strangers," a paradigm that sociologists and historians applied almost unquestioningly to the study of "race relations" throughout the postwar period.
Louis interpreted their rituals so insularly that they could not agree even on a meaning which appealed to all Italian-American Catholics.
Besides living insularly in a divided country for 40 years, the Wall and the nearby forbidden West provided inhabitants with a constant reminder of their dividedness.