insufflate

(redirected from insufflations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to insufflations: intranasal

in·suf·flate

(in-sŭf'lāt),
To deliver air or gas under pressure to a cavity or chamber of the body; for instance, injection of carbon dioxide into the peritoneum to achieve pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopy and laparoscopic surgery.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]

insufflate

(ĭn′sə-flāt′, ĭn-sŭf′lāt′)
tr.v. insuf·flated, insuf·flating, insuf·flates
1. To blow or breathe into or on.
2. To treat medically by blowing a powder, gas, or vapor into a bodily cavity.

in′suf·fla′tor n.

insufflate

[in′səflāt, insuf′lāt]
Etymology: L, insufflare, to blow into
to blow a gas or powder into a tube, cavity, or organ to allow visual examination, to remove an obstruction, or to apply medication. See also Rubin's test. insufflation, n.

in·suf·flate

(in'sŭ-flāt)
To blow air, gas, or fine powder into a cavity.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]

insufflate

V.
1. To blow into or upon.
2. To treat by blowing a drug in powder, gaseous, or vaporous form into a body cavity.

in·suf·flate

(in'sŭ-flāt)
To deliver air or gas under pressure to a body cavity or chamber.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]
References in periodicals archive ?
as against that of veress needle: two blind enteries with one intervening blind insufflation, insufflaion and trocar insertion.
Ahmad G et al (2012) in their similar study reported that a reduction in the incidence of failed entry, reduced risk of extraperitoneal insufflation and reduced omental injury were demonstrated with the use of direct entry technique in comparison to Veress needle entry.
Elevating the abdominal wall and inserting the trocar before insufflation makes it easier to feel each layer during trocar insertion than it is when the abdomen is distended with gas.
After intubation, carbon dioxide insufflation, 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min and after carbon dioxide desufflation, the statistical difference in the two groups was highly significant (p<0.
2]) values increased after insufflation of carbon dioxide with values significantly higher after lateral tilt positioning.
Wakizaka Y et al (1994) (14) studied the effects of carbon dioxide insufflation during laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the arterial blood gases and pH.
The statistical difference in the two groups was highly significant after intubation, carbon dioxide insufflation, 5 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, 90 min, 120 min after insufflation and after desufflation (p<0.