insufflate


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in·suf·flate

(in-sŭf'lāt),
To deliver air or gas under pressure to a cavity or chamber of the body; for instance, injection of carbon dioxide into the peritoneum to achieve pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopy and laparoscopic surgery.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]

insufflate

(ĭn′sə-flāt′, ĭn-sŭf′lāt′)
tr.v. insuf·flated, insuf·flating, insuf·flates
1. To blow or breathe into or on.
2. To treat medically by blowing a powder, gas, or vapor into a bodily cavity.

in′suf·fla′tor n.

insufflate

[in′səflāt, insuf′lāt]
Etymology: L, insufflare, to blow into
to blow a gas or powder into a tube, cavity, or organ to allow visual examination, to remove an obstruction, or to apply medication. See also Rubin's test. insufflation, n.

in·suf·flate

(in'sŭ-flāt)
To blow air, gas, or fine powder into a cavity.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]

insufflate

V.
1. To blow into or upon.
2. To treat by blowing a drug in powder, gaseous, or vaporous form into a body cavity.

in·suf·flate

(in'sŭ-flāt)
To deliver air or gas under pressure to a body cavity or chamber.
[L. in-sufflo, to blow on or into]
References in periodicals archive ?
We have used this assembly successfully to insufflate oxygen using the oxygen flush in a 24-year-old male with multiple facial fractures when we could neither ventilate nor intubate the trachea.
When taken together, the findings could change current practice, which is to insufflate to a pressure of 15 mm Hg or to a volume of 3-4 L of C[O.
Once a patient has satisfied all criteria for treatment eligibility, we perform the procedure as described earlier, except that we do not insufflate the area with antiseptic powder.
I then insufflate the abdomen with enough carbon dioxide to increase the intraabdominal pressure to 25 mm Hg.