institutionalism


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social

 [so´shal]
pertaining to societies or other groups of people.
social anxiety disorder social phobia.
social breakdown syndrome deterioration of social and interpersonal skills, work habits, and behavior seen in chronically hospitalized psychiatric patients. Symptoms are due to the effects of long term hospitalization rather than the primary illness, and include excessive passivity, assumption of the chronic sick role, withdrawal, and apathy. Such effects are also seen in long term inmates of prisons or concentration camps. Called also institutionalism.
social worker a professional trained in the treatment of psychosocial problems of patients and their families. Family social workers practice social case work. Psychiatric social workers practice various forms of counseling and group or individual psychotherapy. Most social workers have a master's degree in social work (M.S.W.). There are also bachelor's (B.S.W.) and doctoral (D.S.W.) degrees in social work.

in·sti·tu·tion·al·ism

(insti-tūshŭn-ăl-izm)
Maladaptation pattern seen in the mentally ill and others confined to group homes that renders it problematic for them to function outside such a setting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sociological Institutionalism (SI) is the first school addressed here because it offers the least with respect to explaining the resilience of the Indian Act.
By doing so the paper attempts to open up future potential and allow researchers to analyze the theoretical contestation of new institutionalism through empirical evidence from in Pakistan.
Discursive institutionalism is an outcome of the three preceding neo- institutionalisms.
In the face of Canadians' apparent suspicion of anything to do with religious institutionalism, the real question for the church is not if it should be ordaining people who are not heterosexual, but whether it should be ordaining people at all.
This work is considered the "manifesto" of the approach you coined as Cognitive Institutionalism (CI).
The inclusion of more case studies with varying combinations of the three policy parameters would enhance the applicability of the refined theory of historical institutionalism.
When developed, democratic institutionalism is stable and progressive because it creates "countervailing power" by distributing power widely.
We might think of this theory in terms of structural institutionalism (3): a conception of the constitutional order in which various institutions outside the realm of political government "develop their own visions of what the First Amendment means" (p.
The research based on the new historical institutionalism is thus consistent to the latest tendencies of the literature which theoretically outline the field of administrative history from constitutional history, law history, political history.
The institutional approach used in organisational analysis is referred to as organisational institutionalism (Greenwood et al.
The course aimed to explain the concept and strategies of changing, means of foreseeing the future and strategic planning and thinking, in addition to the development of working methods to meet the modern variables and the inevitability of transformation to institutionalism, means of decision-making and taking appropriate decisions.
In focusing on promoting institutionalism in the classrooms, our schools have marginalised an entire class of citizens -- 'The Creative Class.