insoluble fibre


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insoluble fibre

One of two forms of dietary fibre (the other being soluble fibre) consisting of indigestible cellulose, which adds bulk to the stool and has a laxative effect.

Insoluble fibre-rich foods
Whole wheat, whole grains, wheat bran, corn bran, seeds, nuts, barley, couscous, brown rice, bulgur, zucchini, celery, broccoli, cabbage, onions, tomatoes, carrots, cucumbers, green beans, dark leafy vegetables, raisins, grapes, fruit and root vegetable skins.
References in periodicals archive ?
The insoluble fibre in baked beans is not digested but moves into the large intestine, or colon, where bacteria act on it and produce short-chain fatty acids.
Dr Sarah Jarvis says: "Both the soluble fibres found in fruits and oats and the insoluble fibre found in bran and cereals can help to reduce the risk of developing heart disease.
There are 61 calories in 100g of fresh leeks and their elongated stalks provide soluble and insoluble fibre.
28 August 2013 - New York-headquartered buyout firm Arsenal Capital Partners announced on Wednesday it had acquired local cellulose-based insoluble fibre products supplier International Fiber Corp (IFC) from Swander Pace Capital.
28 August 2013 a[euro]" New York-headquartered buyout firm Arsenal Capital Partners announced on Wednesday it had acquired local cellulosea[euro]based insoluble fibre products supplier International Fiber Corp (IFC) from Swander Pace Capital.
Insoluble fibre helps prevent constipation and soluble fibre may help to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.
The older leaves contain more of the insoluble fibre that causes gas.
Fruit and vegetables contain both soluble and insoluble fibre - but much of it is in the skin so, whenever possible, don't peel them.
Insoluble fibre helps prevent constipation, and soluble fibre may help to reduce the amount of cholesterol in the blood.
A IT is possible you are not eating enough insoluble fibre that is needed to help a sluggish bowel.
Oats are a good source of insoluble fibre, may help reduce cholesterol, and release energy slowly, making you feel fuller for longer.
Foods rich in insoluble fibre include wheat and rye, and a small amount is present in fruits and vegetables.