insipid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

insipid

[insip′id]
Etymology: L, in + sapidus, savory
dull, tasteless, or lifeless.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Sutherland frames much of the action around images of insipid inspiration emanating from local church marquees (``God Answers Knee-Mail,'' ``Worry About Nothing/Pray About Everything'') that seem to belie the facts of these desperate lives.
The jaunty It's Not Like Everyone's My Friend and new single Be All You Want Me To Be showed the band at their best - but all too often they seemed to be following the Keane path to rock blandness, especially on insipid ballad Oceans.
Far less successful are Lucas's "bunny" works, insipid creatures fashioned from pantyhose.
After reading your novel a second time I found it to be uncommonly insipid.
But if you're willing to overlook the hijacked plot elements, an insipid script, and mediocre acting, the dance sequences may be reward enough.
To critics who claim that Therese was an insipid creature, too ephemeral for us moderns, he argues that she "never once is divorced from reality", citing examples from her life to document his statement.
Insipid islander Cameron had 44 per cent of the 18,000 votes cast last night.
McWhorter blasts Spike Lee's Bamboozled as unwatchable while praising the insipid Swordfish for it's colorblind casting of Halle Berry.
We can no longer afford to luxuriate in insipid gamesmanship.
It was filled with a pale, pink-colored liquid that might once have included a smidgen of grape juice among its other, largely insipid ingredients.
Of all the misguided claims made about the First Amendment, this is perhaps the most insipid.
CHARLOTTE ALLEN provides a rare service for a readerly, but non-specialist audience -- a far-ranging discussion of a controverted field, which aims to be fair without self-destructing in insipid neutrality.