insect stings

insect stings

toxins from stinging organs of insect, causing marked local skin pain, acute inflammation and swelling; controlled by topical antihistamine cream; some patients show idiosyncratic anaphylactic response to insect stings
References in classic literature ?
Gone, gone, sold and gone To the rice swamp dank and lone, Where the slave-whip ceaseless swings, Where the noisome insect stings, Where the fever-demon strews Poison with the falling dews, Where the sickly sunbeams glare Through the hot and misty air:-- Gone, gone, sold and gone To the rice swamp dank and lone, From Virginia hills and waters-- Woe is me, my stolen daughters
Yellow jackets alone are responsible for about one half of all human insect stings.
Around three in 100 healthy adults are known to have an allergy to insect stings or bites.
Anaphylaxis is a very serious allergic reaction triggered by foods, insect stings, some medicines and latex.
Allergy to insect stings can cause pain, swelling, and redness at the site of the sting.
Tweezers and fingers can actually squeeze more venom into the body, so use a flat object, like the blunt edge of a knife or a credit card, to scrape away insect stings as quickly as possible and apply a cold compress.
Jext is a single-use adrenaline auto-injector intended for the emergency treatment of severe acute allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) to insect stings or bites, foods, drugs and other allergens as well as exercise induced anaphylaxis.
Triggers can include anything from drugs, plants, jewellery (nickel) to foods like nuts and shellfish, infections of all kinds, insect stings, cold, heat and sweat.
First aid for insect stings is to use a cold compress or ice cube to cool the area, and take an ordinary painkiller such as paracetamol.
Insect stings in non- allergic people, though perhaps painful and irritating to the skin, usually do not cause serious problems.
Although most severe reactions of hymenoptera stings occur with the first sting, patients who have previously experienced insect stings are at increased risk for severe allergic reactions from future stings.
Peanut allergy is the most widely known cause, but other causes of anaphylaxis include other foods, insect stings, latex and drugs.