insatiable

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Related to insatiability: inconvenient, scrutinised

insatiable

[insā′shē·əbəl]
Etymology: L, insatiatus, not satisfied
pertaining to an appetite for food or other needs that cannot be satisfied.

insatiable

(ĭn-sā′shă-b'l) [L. insatiabilis]
Incapable of being satisfied or appeased.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a consequence, wealth becomes an objective end grounded in the cosmological belief in environmental scarcity, and an ontological belief in insatiability.
This passage contains remarkable language of insatiability and consumption, interlinked with Knight's feelings of repulsion for Devill and his daughters.
Eli's primary mode of expression is through crude, vulgar language and sex, and he constantly shows his insatiability.
No single chemical is likely to control such a complex behavior as appetite, Geracioti and others warn, noting that further research may show that abnormalities in CCK secretion are as much a result as a cause of a vicious cycle of insatiability.
In the language itself, we can read the insatiability of their love.
For the relevant argument that a turn from production to consumption models of human behavior in the 1870's accounts for comparable late nineteenth-century transformations in economic theory and, consequently, aesthetic taste, see Regenia Gagnier, The Insatiability of Human Wants: Economics and Aesthetics in Market Society (Chicago: Univ.
While women's insatiability remained a central feature of comic cards (hinting at the persistence of an older conception of female sexuality), this insatiability also reflected on the virility of aristocratic men.
24) Regenia Gagnier, "On the Insatiability of Human Wants: Economic and Aesthetic Man," Victorian Studies 36 (1992-1993), pp.
And just when it appears as if she is coming to some resolution, an understanding that life brims with fullness and that she wants to refuse its limit and source of a fixed identity (death), she returns to the open-ended and surprising insatiability, changing the reader's vision of scope and size.
The evolution of the Polish novel, like that of all other genres, was conditioned by various reinterpretations of that schema--at times pathetic, at times satirical--from Micinski's Father Faust, through Zeromski, to socialist realist novels; from Witkacy's Insatiability to Dygat's Bodensee and Mrozek's Moniza Clavier.
Press, 2000); Regenia Gagnier on economics, The Insatiability of Human Wants : Economics and Aesthetics in Market Society (Chicago: Univ.
One unpleasant outcome of a remarried widow's feared insatiability is jealousy, as The Bachelor's Banquet makes clear: