inotropic

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Related to inotropism: positive inotropic agent

inotropic

 [in″o-trop´ik]
affecting the force of muscular contractions.

in·o·tro·pic

(in'ō-trop'ik),
Influencing the contractility of muscular tissue.
[ino- + G. tropos, a turning]

inotropic

/in·o·tro·pic/ (in´o-tro″pik) affecting the force of muscular contractions.

inotropic

(ē′nə-trō′pĭk, -trŏp′ĭk, ī′nə-)
adj.
Affecting the contraction of muscle, especially heart muscle: an inotropic drug.

inotropic

[in′ōtrop′ik]
Etymology: Gk, inos, fiber, trope, turning
pertaining to the force or energy of muscular contractions, particularly those of the heart. An inotropic agent increases myocardial contractility.

in·o·tro·pic

(in'ō-trō'pik)
Influencing the contractility of muscular tissue.
[ino- + G. tropos, a turning]

inotropic

Influencing the force or speed of muscular contractility. Inotropic agents, such as dobutamine and dopamine are used to improve the output of the heart in the treatment of HEART FAILURE and sometimes in acute circulatory failure (SHOCK).

inotropic

affecting or controlling the strength of heart contractions. For example, chemicals that increase the force of contraction have a positive inotropic effect.

inotropic (īˈ·n·trōˑ·pik),

adj regarding muscle contraction, particularly the contraction of cardiac muscle.

inotropic

affecting the force of muscular contractions; commonly applied to drugs that increase contractility of cardiac muscle, e.g. digitalis glycosides.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is critical to monitor clinical signs of cardiotoxicity (1-3) such as ventricular arrhythmias, prolonged QT interval, direct myocardial effects such as inotropism or negative chronotropism, bradycardia and hypotension.
7 [micro]M, respectively; values which are different from those required for inotropism.
Rather, it can be attributed to enhanced mental alertness or an increase in a phenomenon scientists call cardiac inotropism.
BP studies have shown the following in vitro effects in rodent tissue: positive inotropism, sedation, analgesic activity, H1 antagonism (ileum, bronchial muscle, peripheral vasculature), and antimicrobial activity (Oliver-Bever 1983; Pal et al.
This has been shown to cause additional myocardial inotropism (when compared to caval occlusion) perhaps by reflex responses to decreased distal perfusion (17).