injunction


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injunction

[injungk′shən]
Etymology: L, injungere, to enjoin
a court order that prevents a party from performing a specified act.

injunction

(ĭn-jŭnk′shŭn) [L. injungere, to fasten, join]
A court order prohibiting an individual from performing some act or demanding that a person begin to perform some act.
References in periodicals archive ?
980(c)(1), Temporary Injunction for Protection Against Domestic Violence with Minor Child(ren).
There, if the patent owner wins the case, an injunction (technically called an "exclusion order") is the only remedy.
First, consider the PR effects because if at any stage the injunction gets lifted or if the story runs anywhere outside of the British court's jurisdiction, such as the U.
Using new powers, council officers and police successfully applied to the court the next day for an emergency injunction.
However, in my opinion, little would have been gained by having the injunction formally quashed, and little has been lost by their failure to get their way.
The request for a preliminary injunction, therefore, was denied.
The referee also recommended that the Yellowstone injunction be extended for six months to enable Waldbaum to complete the improvements, and at the same time, recommended that Waldbaum's renewal option be extended to 30 days after the completion of the cure.
Many of the acts that are targeted within a criminal street gang injunction are punishable as criminal offenses.
But faced with arrest and a minimum of $1000 bond for release, the boycott leadership decided it had no choice but to comply with the injunction, and the Pennsylvania Avenue picketing was called off little more than a week after it began.