burial

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Related to inhumation: burial

burial

see carcass disposal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on stratigraphic evidence, however, some of these primary burials appear to have been reopened at a later date in order to place isolated crania (and sometimes other skeletal elements) near the earlier primary inhumation.
Au Canada, des 1690, Monseigneur de St-Vallier decida de restreindre les inhumations dans l'eglise en exigeant des frais de cent livres pour Montreal et de quarante livres pour les campagnes (33).
The human bone most commonly occurs in small quantities, frequently representing just one individual, but complete inhumation burials are also known.
Vinicani (Macedonia), inhumation burial, fragment of a Werner's class I C fibula: Babic 1976, p.
In Finland, this ritual could have been part of some Neolithic inhumation burials, where the shape of some grave pits suggests the use of skins as stretchers or wrappings (Ayrapaa 1931; Torvinen 1979).
My curiosity had risen because of the small size of some of the pieces of Viking jewellery found in an inhumation burial.
There are some partial parallels with other sites in the region, including Tabon Cave where (unburnt) poorly stratified human remains were found associated with Late Palaeolithic assemblages (Fox 1970) and Niah Cave in Borneo, where (unburnt) Late Palaeolithic inhumation burials have been identified (Harrisson 1967).
The Pulemelei mound might contain human remains that are difficult to identify, however, with remote-sensing methods--for instance, if there was secondary interment of skeletal elements in mound voids, or inhumation within the mound was followed by vault/cavity collapse.
As part of a new study of the Early Iron Age burials in the area of the Classical Agora, all of the human remains from the cremation and inhumation burials that were kept are being reexamined.
But because the indigenous Britons were exposed to the influence of Christianity, many of them practised inhumation, but burial without accompanying grave-goods.
Burial was mostly by inhumation, but the presence of cremation remains cannot be ruled out.