infusate

infusate

[infyo̅o̅′sāt]
a parenteral fluid slowly introduced into a patient over a specific period.

in·fu·sate

(in-fyūzāt)
A fluid given intravenously over a period of time for therapeutic purposes.

infusate

(ĭn-fū′zāt) [L. infusus, poured into]
Any liquid introduced into the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia after receipt of intravenous infusate of cytokine-induced killer cell therapy for body beautification and health boosting.
Bines and Hart (1984) reporting plasma hormones and metabolite responses to intraruminal infusion of VFA mixtures in cattle found that insulin concentrations were less when propionate was omitted from the infusate.
Roussel and colleagues conducted a small uncontrolled trial in 6 adults where EDTA chelation therapy was administered according to standard protocol except for elimination of the vitamin C from the infusate.
However, Mace et al (14) in acute intestinal perfusion experiments found no change in mannitol transport, when they incorporated calcium in the infusate.
It is rarely necessary to culture infusate specimens.
Studies show that accurate lab results can be obtained when the IV is shut off for three minutes and the first 5cc discarded; however, one must consider the infusate.
There were no differences between the two groups with respect to catheter size, type of infusate, presence of diabetes, or history of prior thrombosis.
When we assayed the catechol contents of the TYR infusate dispensed by our pharmacy [1 g/L (6.
Usefulness of the software algorithm was assessed based on its ability to eliminate sub-optimally positioned catheters that would likely limit drug distribution due to leakage into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, and on the match of the volume of distribution of the infusate as shown by SPECT and simulation.
set up routine by installing it on the IV pole just below a fluid/blood warmer to capture smaller air bubbles that are typically generated during the infusate heating process.
In a large prospective study using molecular subtyping, Mermel et al showed that about 75% of PAC-related infections occurred via the extraluminal route and about 25% via endoluminal contamination from the hub of the infusate (23).
39) Significant side effects associated with propofol include hypotension, hypertriglyceridemia, and a risk of infection caused by the infusate medium.