informed decision

(redirected from Informed Choice)
A decision by a patient about a diagnostic or therapeutic procedure, based on choice, which requires the decision to be voluntary and that the patient has the capacity for choice, which rests on 3 elements:
• Possession of a set of values and goals
• Ability to understand information and communicate decisions
• Ability to reason and deliberate

informed decision

Informed choice Patients rights A decision by a Pt about a diagnostic or therapeutic procedure that is based on choice, which requires that the decision be voluntary and that the Pt has the capacity for choice, which rests on 3 elements: possession of a set of values and goals; ability to understand information and communicate decisions; ability to reason and deliberate. See Informed consent.
References in periodicals archive ?
14 editorial ('Freedom of informed choice,' Opinion) which lauds President Duterte's executive order directing certain government departments to implement the Reproductive Health Act.
Kingsmill is committed to ensuring that consumers can make an informed choice when it comes to bakery product purchases, and the new labels will start to appear on pack from January 2014.
Instead, EEF is urging the Prime Minister to lead a debate, which will provide an informed choice for British businesses, those working for them and, current and potential investors.
com)-- Optimum Nutrition's (ON) company owned and operated powdered product production operation in Aurora, Illinois is now an Informed Choice Certified manufacturing facility.
Informed choice is internationally recognised and accepted as an important aspect of ethical health care.
The report came from Informed Choice, a Boston, MA, testing program.
They said that robust monitoring of standards was urgently needed so that patients could make a truly informed choice about their treatment.
Slow Foods give voice to the grower/producer with the hope that if the consumer is informed, then an informed choice will be made when buying one's food.
This paper sets out a number of proposals to assist people to plan more effectively for their retirement under the banner of Informed Choice.
A researcher is obligated to honor a teenager's decision if he or she believes that it represents an informed choice.
The employment goal also must reflect the individual's interests and informed choice to the extent that those factors are consistent with the individual's strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.