inflammatory response


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Related to inflammatory response: inflammation, Systemic inflammatory response syndrome

response

 [re-spons´]
any action or change of condition evoked by a stimulus.
acute phase response a group of physiologic processes occurring soon after the onset of infection, trauma, inflammatory processes, and some malignant conditions. The most prominent change is a dramatic increase of acute phase proteins in the serum, especially C-reactive protein. Also seen are fever, increased vascular permeability, and a variety of metabolic and pathologic changes.
anamnestic response the rapid reappearance of antibody in the blood following introduction of an antigen to which the subject had previously developed a primary immune response.
auditory brainstem response ABR; a special hearing test that tracks the nerve signals arising in the inner ear as they travel along the auditory nerve to the brain region responsible for hearing. A small speaker placed near the ear makes a clicking sound, and special electrodes record the nerve signal as it travels. The test can determine where along the nerve there is a lesion responsible for sensorineural hearing loss. It is often used for individuals with such loss in just one ear; this is often caused by a benign tumor along the auditory nerve, but if the ABR reading is normal in a given region, the chances of there being a tumor there are small. This test can also be used on infants since it requires no conscious response from the person being tested.
autoimmune response the immune response in which antibodies or immune lymphoid cells are produced against the body's own tissues. See also autoimmune disease.
conditioned response see conditioned response.
dysfunctional ventilatory weaning response a nursing diagnosis adopted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability of a patient to adjust to lowered levels of mechanical ventilator support, which interrupts and prolongs the process of weaning. See also mechanical ventilatory weaning.
galvanic skin response the alteration in the electrical resistance of the skin associated with sympathetic nerve discharge.
immune response see immune response.
inflammatory response the various changes that tissue undergoes when it becomes inflamed; see inflammation.
post-trauma response former name for the nursing diagnosis post-trauma syndrome.
reticulocyte response increase in the formation of reticulocytes in response to a bone marrow stimulus.
triple response (of Lewis) a physiologic reaction of the skin to stroking with a blunt instrument: first a red line develops at the site of stroking, owing to the release of histamine or a histamine-like substance, then a flare develops around the red line, and lastly a wheal is formed as a result of local edema.
unconditioned response an unlearned response, i.e., one that occurs naturally, in contrast to a conditioned response.

inflammatory response

a tissue reaction to injury or an antigen that may include pain, swelling, itching, redness, heat, and loss of function. The response may involve dilation of blood vessels and consequent leakage of fluid, causing edema; leukocytic exudation; and release of plasma proteases and vasoactive amines such as histamine.

response

(ri-spons') [L. responsum, an answer]
1. A reaction, e.g., contraction of a muscle or secretion of a gland, resulting from a stimulus. See: reaction
2. The total of an individual's reactions to specific conditions, e.g., the response of a patient to a certain treatment or to a challenge to the immune system.

acute phase response

Acute phase reaction.

auditory evoked response

Response to auditory stimuli determined by a method independent of the individual's subjective response. The electroencephalogram has been used to record response to sound. By measuring intensity of sound and presence of response, one can test the acuity of hearing of psychiatric patients, people who are asleep, and children too young to cooperate in a standard hearing test.

brainstem auditory evoked response

Evoked response audiometry.

clinical benefit response

Abbreviation: CBR
An improvement in at least one important symptom or element of the quality of life of a cancer patient that directly results from treatment, without any decline in any other element of the patient's quality of life.

Patient care

Some cancers are not curable or responsive to treatment with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. However, one or more of their most distressing symptoms may be manageable, e.g. alleviation of pain by therapy. Palliation of pain, nausea, or breathlessness, even in the absence of cure, is a clinically beneficial goal of treatment for some incurable tumors, such as cancers of the pancreas.

complete response

Abbreviation: CR
In cancer care, the eradication by treatment of all of a readily identifiable tumor. A complete response differs from a cure in that microscopic amounts of tumor the may remain in the patient and later produce a relapse.

conditioned response

See: conditioned reflex

Cushing response

See: Cushing, Harvey

defense-oriented response

A coping mechanism by which people try to protect themselves from anxiety or psychological harm.

dose response

1. The relationship between the quantity or intensity of a treatment regimen and its effect on living cells, tissues, or organisms.
2. The relationship between the intensity of an exposure, e.g., to an infectious pathogen, physical stressor, or a toxin, and its effect on living organisms.

durable response

In cancer care, a long-lasting positive reaction to tumor therapy, usually lasting at least a year.

end of treatment response

Abbreviation: EOT, ETR
In the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, the eradication of detectable virus from the blood after a complete course of antiviral therapy.

evoked response

Evoked potential.

F response

In electrodiagnostic study of spinal reflexes, the time required for a stimulus applied to a motor nerve to travel in the opposite direction up the nerve to the spinal cord and return.

galvanic skin response

The measurement of the change in the electrical resistance of the skin in response to stimuli.

histological response

The improvement in the appearance of microscopic tissue specimens after treatment of the patient with chemotherapy. Although it is not indicative of a cure, the improved appearance of biopsy specimens after treatment often suggests the patient's prognosis will improve as well.

immune response

The body's reaction to foreign antigens so that they are neutralized or eliminated, thus preventing the diseases or injuries these antigens might cause. It requires that the body recognize the antigen as nonself. There are several major components to the immune response. The nonspecific immune response, or inflammation, is the response of the body's tissues and cells to injury from any source, e.g., trauma, organisms, chemicals, ischemia. As the initial response of the immune system to any threat, it involves vascular, chemical, and white blood cell activities. The specific immune response, involving T cells and B cells, is a reaction to injury or invasion by particular organisms or foreign proteins. The cell-mediated immune response refers to the activity of T lymphocytes (T cells) produced by the thymus in response to antigen exposure. Without T cells, the body cannot protect itself against many disease-causing microbes. The loss of T cells in patients with AIDS, for example, leads to infections with many opportunistic microbes that would otherwise be relatively well tolerated by persons with intact cellular immunity. T-cell activity also is the basis for delayed hypersensitivity, rejection of tissue transplants, and responses to cancers. The humoral immune response refers to the production of antigen-specific antibodies by plasma B lymphocytes (B cells); antibodies attach to foreign antigens in the bloodstream, helping to inactivate or remove them.
See: cell-mediated immunity; humoral immunity; inflammation

inflammatory response

Inflammation.

minor response

In cancer care, a reduction in tumor size by less than 50% but more than 25%.

parachute response

Parachute reflex.

partial response

Abbreviation: PR
In cancer care, a reduction in the size of readily identifiable tumors by 50% or more.

physiological stress response

Stress response.

primary immune response

The initial reaction to an immunogen, during which T and B lymphocytes are activated and antibodies specific to the antigen are produced. This reaction is considered relatively weak but produces large numbers of antigen-specific memory cells.

PSA response

A decrease in the level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of at least 50% in a patient receiving treatment for prostate cancer.

relative dose response

Abbreviation: RDR
1. A progressively increasing reaction of a cell, tissue, or organism to a stimulus.
2. A test used to estimate liver stores of vitamin A in order to identify those with marginal vitamin A deficiency.

relaxation response

The physiological responses produced when one sits quietly with the eyes closed and breathes slowly and methodically. The responses include slower heart rate, decreased blood pressure, and lowered cutaneous resistance. A brief word or phrase (such as a mantra) may be repeated to oneself to help focus the mind or reduce stray thoughts. This approach to meditation or stress reduction may be undertaken once or twice a day, usually for 10 to 30 Min. The relaxation response helps reduce anxiety, high blood pressure, pain, postmenopausal symptoms, and use of medications.

reticulocyte response

An increase in reticulocyte production in response to the administration of a hematinic agent.

secondary immune response

The rapid, strong response by T and B cells to a second or subsequent appearance of an immunogen. This occurs because of the availability of T and B lymphocyte memory cells.

somatosensory evoked response

Abbreviation: SER
Response produced by small, painless electrical stimuli administered to large sensory fibers in mixed nerves of the hand or leg. The electroencephalographic record of the character of the subsequent waves produced helps determine the functional state of the nerves involved.

stress response

The predictable physiological response that occurs in humans as a result of injury, surgery, shock, ischemia, or sepsis. Synonym: physiological stress response

This response is hormonally mediated and is divided into three distinct phases:

Ebb phase (lag phase): For 12 to 36 hr after the precipitating event, the body attempts to conserve its resources. Vital signs (heart, respiration, temperature) are less than normal. Flow phase (hypermetabolic phase): This stage peaks in 3 to 4 days and lasts 9 to 14 days, depending on the extent of the injury or infection and the person's physical and nutritional status. Carbohydrate, protein, and fat are mobilized from tissue stores and catabolized to meet the energy needs of an increased metabolic rate (hypermetabolism). Serum levels of glucose and electrolytes such as potassium can increase dramatically. If this stage is not controlled by removal of the cause or activator, multiple system organ failure or death can result. Anabolic phase (recovery): The anabolic, or healing, phase occurs as the catabolism declines and electrolyte balances are restored. Aggressive nutritional support is often necessary to promote a positive nitrogen balance.

sustained virological response

Abbreviation: SVR
In the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, having no detectable viral RNA in the blood 6 months after the completion of antiviral therapy. SVR is evidence of disease remission, and in many people, of cure.

tonic immobility response

Muscular paralysis that occurs during significant stress or injury, e.g., as an animal is fleeing or trying to fight off a predator. It is a common reaction experienced by animals and humans faced with overwhelming force, e.g., in battle or during sexual assault.

triple response

Any of the three phases of vasomotor reactions that occur when a sharp object is drawn across the skin. In order of appearance, these are red reaction, flare or spreading flush, and wheal.

ultra-rapid virological response

Abbreviation: URVR
The clearing of all hepatitis C viral RNA from the bloodstream after just 2 weeks of antiviral therapy.

unconditioned response

An inherent response rather than a learned response.
See: conditioned reflex

visual evoked response

Abbreviation: VER
A reaction produced in response to visual stimuli. While the patient is watching a pattern projected on a screen, the electroencephalogram is recorded. The characteristics of the wave form, its latency, and the amplitude of the wave can be compared with the normal, and important information concerning the function of the visual apparatus in transmitting stimuli to the brain can be obtained.

inflammatory

pertaining to or emanating from inflammation.

inflammatory bowel disease
an idiopathic disease of cats, principally, and dogs characterized by cyclic bouts of vomiting and or diarrhea which may continue over periods of years; see also lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis.
inflammatory edema
a disease of the subcutis caused usually by Clostridium spp.
inflammatory response
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, we learned overexpression of the iPFK2 enzyme increases fat deposition, suppresses inflammatory responses and improves insulin sensitivity in both adipose and live tissues," he said.
In the second study, 79 healthy participants were assessed for their ability to regulate the inflammatory response and then exposed to a cold virus and monitored for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the chemical messengers that trigger inflammation.
But the current study is one of few that attempt to characterize systemic inflammatory response to such infections, Dr.
In a seminal paper in 2001, he described a model of the inflammatory response that included all the information that he could find about the immune system and inflammation.
These inventions provide a novel and improved method for treating the inflammatory response in order to improve patient outcomes.
The administration of agents that downregulate the fetal inflammatory response is in the early stages of investigation and may rely on the control of the effects of oxygen radicals, which are generated during the course of inflammation.
Finding the cause of the strong inflammatory response is the Holy Grail of this field.
The fetal inflammatory response appears to contribute to the onset of preterm labor, fetal injury and complications, underlying lifetime health challenges facing these children," said the researchers from Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital of Boston.
TNF-[alpha] is an important cytokine in the inflammatory response to SHS.
Although not infective, these molecules provoke a severe inflammatory response.
Working with researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, Immunetrics is commercializing software tools to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis, a complex syndrome resulting from runaway inflammatory response.
Lp-PLA2 is carried to the walls of coronary arteries by LDL, where the enzyme can activate an inflammatory response, promoting atherosclerosis.

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