infiltration analgesia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

analgesia

 [an″al-je´ze-ah]
absence of sensibility to pain, particularly the relief of pain without loss of consciousness; absence of pain or noxious stimulation.
continuous epidural analgesia continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of childbirth, in general surgery to block the pain pathways below the navel, or to relieve chronic unremitting pain.
epidural analgesia analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal.
infiltration analgesia infiltration anesthesia.
patient controlled analgesia (PCA) an apparatus used to relieve acute pain. It consists of a pump attached to an intravenous or subcutaneous injection site and filled with multiple doses of medication that are available when the system is activated by the patient. The pump is programmed to “lock-out” the patient for specified intervals making overdosage unlikely.
patient controlled epidural analgesia patient controlled analgesia in which a narcotic or local anesthetic is administered into the epidural space via a catheter.
relative analgesia in dental anesthesia, a maintained level of conscious sedation short of general anesthesia, usually induced by inhalation of nitrous oxide and oxygen.
transdermal analgesia a method of pain control in which a patch with a rate-controlling membrane is applied to the skin; the medication is deposited in the upper layers of the skin where it is absorbed into the systemic circulation.

infiltration analgesia

Anesthesia produced in a local area by injecting an anesthetic agent into operative sites or wounds.
See also: analgesia

analgesia

absence of sensibility to pain, particularly the relief of pain without loss of consciousness; absence of pain or noxious stimulation. See also analgesic.

continuous caudal analgesia
continuous injection of an anesthetic solution into the sacral and lumbar plexuses within the epidural space to relieve the pain of parturition; also used in general surgery to block the pain pathways caudal to the umbilicus (see also caudal anesthesia).
epidural analgesia
analgesia induced by introduction of the analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. See also epidural.
infiltration analgesia
paralysis of the nerve endings at the site of operation by subcutaneous injection of an anesthetic.
intrasynovial analgesia
surface analgesia, produced by the introduction of a local analgesic agent into the synovial cavity and massaged into tendon sheaths.
intravenous regional analgesia
the local anesthetic agent is injected intravenously caudal to a tourniquet. The tissues below the tourniquet become anesthetized. The tourniquet and the anesthesia can be maintained for up to 15 minutes. Called also Bier block (technique).
local analgesia
injection of an anesthetic agent to create local analgesia. Includes infiltration, nerve block, epidural, intrathecal, intrasynovial, subarachnoid. See anesthesia.
perioperative analgesia
given before, during and after the surgical procedure.
pre-emptive analgesia
administration of long-lasting analgesics before surgery to help to avoid the establishment of a sensitized state and result in diminished postoperative pain.
regional analgesia
see regional anesthesia.
segmental analgesia
see segmental dorsolumbar epidural block.
spinal analgesia
injection of an analgesic agent into the spinal canal, generally either into the subarachnoid or epidural space. See also spinal anesthesia.
surface analgesia
local analgesia produced by an anesthetic applied to the surface of mucous membranes, e.g. those of the eye, nose, throat and urethra.
References in periodicals archive ?
Local infiltration analgesia in joint replacement: the evidence and recommedations for clinical practice.
High-volume local infiltration analgesia combined with intravenous or local ketorolac+morphine compared with epidural analgesia after total knee arthroplasty.
Local infiltration analgesia and other multicomponent techniques to improve postoperative outcome--are we comparing oranges and apples?