infarct


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infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such in a young patient like ours with no previous co-morbids presenting with only generalized CNS signs and symptoms; cerebrovascular infarcts would be low on a list of differential diagnosis.
We describe an 81-year-old female patient with cortical infarct who presented with sudden onset isolated foot drop that easily interfered with peripheric nerve lesions.
The participants were stratified as having no infarcts (1,611), only ILLs (50), large infarcts (185), or both lesions (35).
Dawn E Saunders and others it was shown that the volume of MCA infarction visible on MRI in patients within 72 hours of onset predicts outcome; the larger the infarct volume, the worse the outcome and patients with an initial infarct volume of less than 80 [cm.
One previous study found that stroke survivors who exhibited psychotic symptoms were twice as likely to die within 10 years after their infarct (Barboza et al.
Sometimes, only secondary signs of cortical swelling and infarct are apparent on noncontrast CT, raising the question of venous thrombosis.
This patient suddenly showed a disturbance of consciousness immediately after developing her first lacunar infarct at the posterior limb of the right internal capsule, and eventually demonstrated severe cognitive disorder.
Placental weight was taken without umbilical cord and gross placental infarcts were noted.
In this study, 230 (64%) patients had an infarct as compared to 131 (35%) patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage.
The measurements of the highest S100B levels on the third day might be related to the edema effect occurring 2-3 days after ischemic infarct, with a large number of astrocytes undergoing necrosis and progression of inflammation, triggering the deterioration in the blood-brain barrier.
The estimated 300-patient, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial is powered to detect a reduction in infarct size as measured by MRI.
There were no differences in the reduction in infarct size and LV mass between the BMC and placebo groups at any time.