infarct


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Related to infarct: hemorrhagic infarct, Lacunar Infarct

infarct

 [in´fahrkt]
a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by anoxia following occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the tissue, organ, or part.
anemic infarct one due to sudden interruption of arterial circulation to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

in·farct

(in'farkt),
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2)
[L. in-farcio, pp. -fartus (-ctus, an incorrect form), to stuff into]

infarct

/in·farct/ (in´fahrkt) a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part.
anemic infarct  one due to the sudden arrest of circulation in a vessel, or to decoloration of hemorrhagic blood.
hemorrhagic infarct  one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.

infarct

(ĭn′färkt′, ĭn-färkt′)
n.
An area of tissue that undergoes necrosis as a result of obstruction of local blood supply, as by a thrombus or embolus.

in·farct′ed adj.

infarct

[infärkt′]
Etymology: L, infarcire, to stuff
a localized area of necrosis in a tissue resulting from anoxia. It is caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the area or, less frequently, by circulatory stasis produced by the occlusion of a vein that ordinarily carries blood away from the area. Some infarcts are pale and white because of the lack of circulation. Others may resemble a red, swollen bruise because of hemorrhage and an accumulation of blood in the area. Also called infarction.
enlarge picture
Infarct

infarct

Pathology Dead/necrotic tissue. See Acute myocardial infarct, Anemic infarct, Lacunar infarct, Myocardial infarct, Non-Q-wave infarct, Pseudoinfarct, Q wave infarct, Red infarct, Reperfusion-eligible acute myocardial infarct, Watershed infarct, White infarct. Cf Infarction.

in·farct

(in'fahrkt)
An area of necrosis resulting from a sudden insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply.
Synonym(s): infarction (2) .

infarct

A volume of dead tissue lying within living tissue, the death being caused by local loss of blood supply. Infarcted tissue swells and becomes firm, and blood vessels around an infarct widen. Plasma and blood may pass into the infarct, increasing the swelling. Later the infarct becomes pale and shrinks and soon it is replaced by fibrous tissue and is converted into a scar which is usually at least as strong as the original tissue. Function is, of course, lost.

Infarct

Death of tissue due to shutting off the blood supply.
Mentioned in: Tetralogy of Fallot

infarct

area of tissue necrosis caused by infarction

infarct (in·färktˑ),

n localized tissue death resulting from an interruption of blood supply to that area. Also called
infarction.
Enlarge picture
Infarct.

in·farc·tion

(in-fahrk'shŭn)
Area of tissue necrosis caused by impaired arterial or venous blood supply due to mechanical factors (e.g., emboli, thrombi) or to blood pressure alterations.
Synonym(s): infarct.

infarct (in´färkt),

n the death of a tissue caused by partial occlusion of a vessel or vessels supplying the area.

infarct

a localized area of ischemic necrosis produced by occlusion of the arterial supply or the venous drainage of the part. Clinical signs depend on the size of the devitalized tissue and the organ affected.

anemic infarct
one due to sudden interruption of flow of arterial blood to the area.
hemorrhagic infarct
one that is red owing to oozing of erythrocytes into the injured area.
References in periodicals archive ?
In our study, the highest serum S100B levels, especially on the third day, correlated well with the infarct volume, and this result led us to think that serum S100B levels show the width of brain injury and can be used as a peripheral marker.
Although a larger case series is needed, macroscopic fat embolism should be considered in the differential diagnostic subset of non-hemorrhagic infarct when a patient presents with neurological symptoms following cardiac surgery, especially after a valve-replacement procedure.
By re-introducing miR29b at the infarct site, it decreased stroke-induced brain lesion by half as compared to control.
vivax malaria, whereas symptomatic splenic infarct is a rare complication of P.
Major finding: An infarct in the subcortical gray matter was the only significant predictor of verbal memory in a logistic regression equation that accounted for 17% of variance in verbal memory, and an infarct in cortical gray matter was a significant predictor (along with educational level) in a logistic regression equation that accounted for 43% of the variance in executive function.
The study concluded that pre treatment with dietary OLE may reduce infarct volume neurobehavioural deficit scores in an animal model of cerebral ischemia.
2004) could promote stem and progenitor cell migration to the heart, activate cell survival signaling, enhance angiogenesis in the infarct area, and eventually improved cardiac function after MI.
MBP and NSE concentrations in CSF did not correlate with the NIHSS score on admission or with infarct volume (MBP, R = 0.
The increase in left ventricular mass is the result of hypertrophy of the cardiac myocytes in non-infarcted myocardium remote to the infarct zone.
The interval from the first clinically apparent acute myocardial infarct to death varied from 2 to 28 years (mean, 13) and was [greater than or equal to]10 years in 24 of 32 patients (75%) for whom this information was available.