infantile sexuality


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sexuality

 [sek″shoo-al´ĭ-te]
1. the characteristic quality of the male and female reproductive elements.
2. the constitution of an individual in relation to sexual attitudes or activity. This is a broad concept that includes aspects of the physical, psychological, social, emotional, and spiritual makeup of an individual. It is not limited to the physical or biological reproductive elements and behavior, but encompasses the manner in which individuals use their own roles, relationships, values, customs, and gender.
human sexuality in the omaha system, the sexuality of human beings.
infantile sexuality in freudian theory, the erotic life of infants and children, encompassing the oral, anal, and phallic phases of psychosexual development.

in·fan·tile sex·u·al·i·ty

in psychoanalytic personality theory, the concept concerning psychosexual development in infants and children; encompasses the overlapping oral, anal, and phallic phases during the first 5 years of life.

in·fan·tile sex·u·al·i·ty

(in'făn-tīl sek'shū-al'i-tē)
psychoanalysis The body of theories concerning psychosexual development in infants and children; encompasses the overlapping oral, anal, and phallic phases during the first 5 years of life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that Lawrence accuses Freud of being "wrong" in attributing sexual motives to children indicates that he was well aware of Freud's theories of infantile sexuality (Fantasia 108).
A number of critics--Elizabeth Wright (49-55), David Ellis (89-109), and Anne Fernihough (61-82)--have explored Lawrence's clashes with Freud without, however, dealing in depth with the issue of infantile sexuality.
Yet the sexual context itself, so seductively laden with innocence, like the turtles she imitates, quickly recovers the psychoanalytic relevance of the theory of infantile sexuality as an explanation.
Unfortunately, I suspect they have done: not because the judges read Freud or have acquired knowledge of his writings through some process of osmosis (as they have Bowlby, according to the authors); but because they allowed |psy' professionals to propagate Freudian theories of infantile sexuality as if they were scientific knowledge.
Boyarin offers an all-embracing explanation for Freud's controversial switch from the seduction theory to the theory of instinctual infantile sexuality as well as his development of the "phallic" ideas of oedipal conflict, castration anxiety, and penis envy.
Unfortunately, I suspect they have done: not because the judges read Freud or have acquired knowledge of his writings through some process of osmosis (as they have Bowlby, according to the authors); but because they allowed 'psy' professionals to propagate Freudian theories of infantile sexuality as if they were scientific knowledge.

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