inertial movement

inertial movement

motion without the need for a force. Often occurs when a body segment has been previously accelerated. Consequence of Newton's first law of motion. See also ballistic movement.
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Their topics include developing an electronic notification system for the sentinel surveillance of influenza-like illness, the development of an at-rick assessment approach to dietary data quality in a food-based clinical trial, classifying the movement of people with Parkinsons disease using wearable inertial movement units and machine learning, analyzing health professionals' learning interactions in an online social network: a longitudinal study, and integrating the radiological information system with computerized provider order entry: the impact on repeat medical imaging investigations.
Such a situation calls for a great force to impede the inertial movement of a passenger, however such a massive force could impact the passenger physically, and load limiters allow a cushioned unwinding of the spool to a certain level reducing impact.
The scientific parallel to Transtromer's metaphor of 'the great unknown' he holds steady can well be the so-called Mach principle, which states that every single inertial movement, let us say the spinning of a whirligig, is dependent on the total mass of matter in the universe.
When you add to the digital magnetic compass an accelerometer, you have the ability to measure inertial movement.

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