inebriate

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Related to inebriating: inebriety

inebriate

[inē′brē·āt]
to make intoxicated.

inebriate

(ĭn-ē′brē-āt)
To make drunk or to become intoxicated.

Patient discussion about inebriate

Q. what are the do and and don't do when you are drunk? is there an easy way to get out of the drunken feeling?

A. eating alot of bread soaks up the alcohol.

Q. what happens if i will drink and drive? why is it so dangerous? what cause the blurry when you are drunk?

A. You can take your lives, and even worse, the lives of innocent other people. Driving (or performing any other activity that requires precision and alertness) under the influence of alcohol is dangerous because alcohol acts as a "downer" - it slows the overall brain activity, and makes the drinker to think less clearly, acts slowly, and remove it's inhibition so he or she may make reckless decisions (such as not stopping at traffic lights).

The exact mechanism isn't totally understood, but alcohol acts in a diffuse pattern over many regions of the brain. One doesn't have to be totally drunk in order to be ineligible to drive - relatively small amounts of alcohol may already influence enough to make driving extremely dangerous.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003632.htm

And remember - if you drink, you don't drive. That's what friends are for.

Q. what are the side effects of drinking to much alcohol? beside getting drunk....

A. wow...there are so many...here is a list of short terms effects:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-term_effects_of_alcohol

long terms include bone marrow inhibition and liver cirrhosis. both can be deadly.

More discussions about inebriate
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But beware: This inebriating blend of ultra-literate lyrics and upper-middle-class romantic confession is a martini spiked with hemlock.
Kava is the official inebriating beverage of the South Seas," adds Mark Blumenthal, executive director of the American Botanical Council in Austin, Texas.
Don't worry about inebriating your dinner guests or adding "empty" calories, cooks are told; virtually all of the alcohol volatilizes during food preparation.