individuation

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individuation

 [in″dĭ-vid″u-a´shun]
1. the process of developing individual characteristics.
2. differential regional activity in the embryo occurring in response to organizer influence.
3. in jungian psychology, the process of maturation and development and realization of the individual personality. In immature personalities, the process of individuation and self-realization is delayed. See also jung.

in·di·vid·u·a·tion

(in'di-vid'yū-ā'shŭn),
1. Development of the individual from the specific.
2. In jungian psychology, the process by which one's personality is differentiated, developed, and expressed.
3. Regional activity in an embryo as a response to an organizer.

individuation

/in·di·vid·u·a·tion/ (in″dĭ-vid″u-a´shun)
1. the process of developing individual characteristics.
2. differential regional activity in the embryo occurring in response to organizer influence.

individuation

(ĭn′də-vĭj′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of individuating, especially the process by which social individuals become differentiated one from the other.
2. The condition of being individuated; individuality.
3. In Jungian psychology, the gradual integration and unification of the self through the resolution of successive layers of psychological conflict.
4. Embryology Formation of distinct organs or structures through the interaction of adjacent tissues.

in·di·vid·u·a·tion

(in'di-vij'yū-ā'shŭn)
1. Development of the individual from the specific.
2. jungian psychology The process by which one's personality is differentiated, developed, and expressed.
3. Regional activity in an embryo as a response to an organizer.

individuation

1. the process of developing individual characteristics.
2. differential regional activity in the embryo occurring in response to organizer influence.

Patient discussion about individuation

Q. How do vaccines protect individuals from infectious diseases? Is it a 100% protection? And how come there are diseases without a vaccine?

A. Vaccine is a part of a pathogen (sometime the pathogen itself without the harmful part in it) that we inject to our self in order to get the body “ready” to meet the real disease. Unfortunately not all of the bacteria and viruses have vaccines. Some of them we can not mimic their proteins safely enough, or it won’t work any way. And sometimes it’s only partly effective, the body remembers it but not too well. So some of the vaccines offer only a partial protection.

Q. What kinds of jobs can individuals with autism do, so that they can enjoy life? My friend’s brother feels very bored at home and he often tells me that he is not finding any meaning for his life. What kinds of jobs can individuals with autism do, so that they can enjoy life?

A. Assure him that he is not the one who is alone with these types of negative feelings. In general, individuals with autism perform best at jobs which are structured and involve a degree of repetition. Some people who have autism are working as artists, piano tuners, painters, farm workers, office workers, computer operators, dishwashers, assembly line workers, or competent employees of sheltered workshops or other sheltered work settings.

Q. Regular participation in aerobic exercise lowers an individual's risk of developing cancer? I am a regular participant of aerobic, so the regular participation in aerobic exercise lowers an individual's risk of developing cancer?

A. You have some reason to be happy. Research suggests that exercise often modifies some of the risk factors associated with certain kinds of cancer. Obesity has been linked to cancer of the breast and the female reproductive system. Regular exercise has been shown to help promote weight loss. Several studies have also found that men who worked at sedentary jobs for most of their lives had a greater incidence of colon cancer than those in more active jobs. Exercise will not compensate the effects of a high-fat diet or smoking. Still it can contribute, even indirectly, to a reduced risk of cancer. As such, exercising regularly is recommended by the ACS [American Cancer Society] as an integral part of its cancer prevention program.

More discussions about individuation
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the singularity of the individual, its inadequacy or potential for new individuation, is equated with the possibility of reinterpreting the preindividual already-there.
One can readily see how this reading of individuation as potential for reinterpretation would confirm Hansen's suspicion that Stiegler, as with other thinkers of 'technesis', simply reduces the technical, through interpretation, to the exteriorisation of thought.
The point here is not, as Hansen argues, a narrow claim about the 'technical contamination' of perception, but to establish through the concept of tertiary memory a wider argument about the intrinsic link between technical, psychic and collective individuation.
Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate possible existence of groups of adolescents each with their own profiles of individuation in relation to parents.
In order to extend the knowledge about the characteristics of adolescent individuation in different cultural settings we aimed at searching for internally replicable typology of individuation in relationship to parents in a group of 13-to 18-years old Slovenian adolescents.
Another aim of the study was to find out how adolescents with various individuation patterns perceive their close relationships in the three social contexts: family, peer group and school.
It is also interesting to set Scheler's account of personal individuation in relation to the Aristotelian theory of matter as the principle of individuation: "the ultimate and authentic principium individuationis in man (and not in angels only, as St.
In his study of Scheler, von Balthasar, for all his sympathetic understanding of Scheler, objects to something in Scheler that has emerged in our last few pages, namely to his "distributing the individuation problem over two spheres, so that individuation in the sphere of the spirit is purely positive, but in the vital sphere purely negative (because here it is only the Alleben which is the ultimate subject).
While it is not clear to me why Scheler's account of the positivity of personal individuality tends to exclude "creaturely potentiality," this much seems to be valid in the criticism of Von Balthasar: Scheler tends to an excessive dualism of vital center and personal center in man, a dualism that shows itself in the fundamentally different account of individuation that he offers for each center.
briefly, Simondon's theory of individuation proposed an account of
of Simondon's insights on technology and individuation, points to a
technological individuation and human 'transindividuation'.