indirect

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indirect

/in·di·rect/ (in″di-rekt´)
1. not immediate or straight.
2. acting through an intermediary agent.

indirect

done through an intermediate animal or function.

indirect advertising
advertising about the veterinary profession which indirectly benefits individual veterinarians.
indirect comparisons
comparisons made between individuals or groups in different locations.
indirect contact
see indirect contact.
indirect fluorescent antibody
see fluorescence microscopy.
indirect repeat
indirect selection
improving one character while selecting on another.
indirect social distance
social distance is distance between contacts in an infectious disease; indirect social distance is distance between indirect contacts.
indirect transmission of infection
transmission of infection via another medium, e.g. housing or bedding, without the animals ever being close to each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
modularity, making its simplicity and indirectness both a strength and a
For relevant research bearing on question design in interaction generally, see Pomerantz (1988), Raymond (2003), and the extensive line of research concerning conventional indirectness (e.
The indirectness by which history must realize a moral world order is, of course, not the only problem inherent in the Kantian theory of progress.
The vision of rot, grease, latrines, and decomposition recurs in "Grease," one of the dream stories, though there the immediacy and driven intensity of Trench Town Rock are replaced by the indirectness of a process in which the author is less straitened subject and more controlled interpreter of the tangled and indefinite iconography and vague suggestivity of the dream.
Potential sources of indirectness included a study population or intervention/exposure that was so different from that of interest that there was a compelling reason to think that the magnitude of effect would differ substantially, or studies that reported on surrogate end points instead of the outcome of interest.
As Chen (2006) indicated, the ultimate goal of human communication in Eastern societies is to achieve harmony, which is characterized by indirectness, subtlety, adaptiveness, and consensus in the process of interaction; while Westerners tend to be confrontational through a more direct, expressive, dialectical, and divisive communication style.
Here Brooks talks approvingly of what he terms a method of "rich indirection," an indirectness at work within even the most seemingly direct and simple poetry.
Roos, however, understands the essence of the optative as indirectness of the source of the command rather than optativity (Roos 1982 : 12.
If a character model has been built as categorized, so that a set of expectations has been formed, and readers are then confronted later in the text with an indirect representation of a category-congruent trait, they will be able to process that information effortlessly in spite of its indirectness.
The authors of postmodern historical novels, like John Fowles, Julian Barnes, Jeanette Winterson or Peter Ackroyd, frequently undermine the reliability of their narratives by pointing to the indirectness of our access to the past.