incontinentia


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Related to incontinentia: incontinentia pigmenti

in·con·ti·nence

(in-kon'ti-nens),
1. Inability to prevent the discharge of any of the excretions, especially of urine or feces.
2. Lack of restraint of the appetites, especially sexual. Compare: intemperance.
Synonym(s): incontinentia
[L. incontinentia, fr. in- neg. + con-tineo, to hold together, fr. teneo, to hold]

incontinentia

/in·con·ti·nen·tia/ (-kon″tĭ-nen´shah) [L.] incontinence.
incontinentia pigmen´ti  a hereditary disorder in which early vesicular and later verrucous and bizarrely pigmented skin lesions are associated with eye, bone, and central nervous system defects.

in·con·ti·nence

(in-kon'ti-nĕns)
1. Inability to prevent the discharge of urine or feces.
2. Lack of restraint of the appetites, especially sexual.
Synonym(s): incontinentia.
[L. incontinentia, fr. in- neg. + con-tineo, to hold together, fr. teneo, to hold]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ocular anomalies in incontinentia pigmenti: literature review and meta-analysis.
Retinal and other manifestations of incontinentia pigmenti (Bloch Sulzberger syndrome).
Incontinentia pigmenti: MR demonstration of brain changes.
The gene for incontinentia pigmenti has been mapped to Xq28.
However, it was the MRI findings and the skin biopsy results that finally clinched the diagnosis of Incontinentia pigmenti.
Patients with incontinentia pigmenti often have patchy alopecia of the scalp, dystrophic nails, and tooth abnormalities (fewer teeth than normal or abnormal tooth formation, such as a cone-shaped tooth).
Structural changes of the brain were seen in about half of the patients with linear hyperpigmented bands, half of those with hypomelanosis of Ito, and in one of the children with incontinentia pigmenti.
Despite a growing literature on Aquinas's theory of incontinentia, few publications have dealt with the related concept of malitia.
Although akrasia became incontinentia in Latin, the great Scholastics like Albert and Thomas understood the difference between Aristotle's and Augustine's concerns.
Differential diagnoses considered were epidermal naevus, incontinentia pigmenti and linear and whorled naevoid hypermelanosis.
Clinically it mimicked closely with birth trauma, giant congenital melanocytic nevus, congenital developmental anomaly, incontinentia pigmenti and sclerema neonatorum.
1,2) According to the literature, it has also been associated with some systemic conditions such as Mohr syndrome (Orofacial-digital talon cusp) (9), Sturge-weber syndrome (10), Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (11), incontinentia pigmenti achromians and Ellis-Van creveld syndrome.