incontinent


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Related to incontinent: Bowel incontinence

in·con·ti·nent

(in-kon'ti-nent),
Denoting incontinence.

incontinent

(ĭn-kŏn′tə-nənt)
adj.
1. Lacking normal voluntary control of excretory functions.
2. Lacking sexual restraint; unchaste.

in·con′ti·nent·ly adv.

incontinent

in·con·ti·nent

(in-kon'ti-nĕnt)
Denoting incontinence.

Patient discussion about incontinent

Q. Can you treat urinary incontinence by only making exercise of circular muscles? I heard the exercise help but dont know if it is enough by itself.

A. This technique you have mentioned is called "bio-feedback" and it helps many people with urinary incontinence, by raising your awareness to muscles in your body you don't usually pay attention to, thus making you able to control them better. I do not think this is an only way to treat incontinence, however with the addition of the proper medications you can find this very helpful.

More discussions about incontinent
References in periodicals archive ?
These figures are very similar to those for the 73 incontinent patients and do not differ from them significantly.
Such series is now available for baby and for adult incontinent diapers, for lady sanitary napkins and for panty liners.
Although nursing staff make more frequent incontinence care rounds as part of the intervention, each round takes less time to complete because not every incontinent resident receives care each time (i.
Surveys in the 1980's of people at home who were incontinent revealed a picture of an embarrassed, isolated, underserved population harboring a "secret" too personal to divulge even to their family doctor.
all of a sudden they feel the need to void and must use the restroom immediately or they will have an incontinent episode); residents with stress incontinence (i.
82-year-old Sandra really is incontinent, but the problem started with startling suddenness only two days earlier.
The BedTender and ChairTender control units from Secure Care Products alert staff if a resident leaves a bed or chair, or becomes incontinent.
AmeriCare's flushSafe pad addresses yet another concern that facilities have with incontinent residents, according to Gail Barger, vice-president of marketing.
To conclude, all incontinent residents should be carefully evaluated for cause and type of incontinence.
incontinent residents without a toileting program - the indicator is "flagged," alerting the facility to a potential problem.