inclusion bodies


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in·clu·sion bod·ies

distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with certain filtrable viruses; may be demonstrated by means of various stains, especially Mann eosin methylene blue or Giemsa techniques and visible by light microscopy. Nuclear inclusion bodies are usually acidophilic and are of two morphologic types: 1) granular, hyaline, or amorphous bodies of various sizes, that is, Cowdry type A inclusion bodies, occurring in such diseases as herpes simplex infection or yellow fever; 2) more circumscribed bodies, frequently with several in the same nucleus (and no reaction in adjacent tissue), that is, the type B bodies, occurring in such diseases as Rift Valley fever and poliomyelitis. Cytoplasmic inclusion bodies may be: 1) acidophilic, relatively large, spheric or ovoid, and somewhat granular, as in variola or vaccinia, rabies, and molluscum contagiosum; 2) basophilic, relatively large, complex combinations of viral and cellular material, as in trachoma, psittacosis, and lymphogranuloma venereum. In some instances, inclusion bodies are known to be infective and probably represent aggregates of virus particles in combination with cellular material, whereas others are apparently not infective and may represent only abnormal products formed by the cell in response to injury.

inclusion bodies

normal or abnormal objects of various shapes and sizes observed in the nucleus or cytoplasm of blood cells or other tissue cells.

in·clu·sion bod·ies

(in-klū'zhŭn bod'ēz)
Distinctive structures frequently formed in the nucleus or cytoplasm (occasionally in both locations) in cells infected with various filterable viruses; observed especially in nerve, epithelial, or endothelial cells.

inclusion bodies

Microscopically visible masses of virus material, or areas of altered staining behaviour, seen within cells in a number of virus infections such as RABIES, herpes infections, papovavirus infections and adenovirus infections.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spleen, inclusion bodies are often abundant and are accompanied by necrosis of the perivascular histiocytes and other phagocytic cells.
The myocardiocytes showed intracytoplasmic and intranuclear labeling, but no inclusion bodies could be recognized.
In the liver of IP infected animals (MPX-1, MPX-3, and MPX-4), most of the inclusion bodies were strongly IHC-positive for poxvirus antigen.
The characteristic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in all livers (Figure 1A).
3) The presence of inclusion bodies containing virus particles was considered diagnostic for poxvirus in the case reported here.
Karyomegaly with the presence of large basophilic pan-nuclear inclusion bodies and the hepatic, splenic, intestinal, and pancreatic distribution of the lesions seen in these 3 birds are characteristic of lesions resulting from falcon adenovirus infection and adenoviruses infections in poultry.
Although the K-II centrifuge has not thus far been automated for totally remote operation, including cleaning between runs, this is not an overwhelming problem and should involve cascaded centrifuges, as was done for the mass isolation of Tussock moth polyhedral inclusion bodies (15).
Eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, characteristic of canine distemper, were found in the epithelium of lung, kidney, intestine, and urinary bladder (Figure 1).
The more severely affected animal had active hepatitis with hepatocyte necrosis, lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and inclusion bodies within hepatocytes and sinusoidal histiocytes.
Additionally, eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were present in colonic and gastric epithelia and in transitional epithelium of the kidney.
Numerous neurons contained eosinophilic inclusion bodies, which are highly suggestive of lyssavirus infection.
The Company has successfully expressed antibody fragments, growth factors, antigens, enzymes and other proteins using multiple modes of expression including secretion (yeast), periplasmic secretion, soluble intracellular expression, and inclusion bodies.