incarceration


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incarceration

 [in-kahr″sĕ-ra´shun]
unnatural retention or confinement of a part.

incarceration

/in·car·cer·a·tion/ (in-kahr″ser-a´shun) unnatural retention or confinement of a part.

incarceration

(ĭn″kăr″sĕ-rā′shŭn)
1. Legal confinement.
2. The imprisonment of a part; constriction, as in a hernia.

incarceration

unnatural retention or confinement of a part, e.g. of an intestinal loop.

Patient discussion about incarceration

Q. My friend is imprisoned for a planned murder. My friend is imprisoned for a planned murder. Family and friend assumes that he is bipolar, but as yet he is not been diagnosed. He has answered yes to all the questions in a questionnaire to indicate bipolar. Bipolar do commit murder often and would he have been manic when he did it?

A. It is not uncommon for someone suffering with bipolar to commit crimes, mostly this happens in a manic state. His family can talk to his lawyer about getting him a pychological evaluation, if he is dagnosed bipolar they can begin to treat him. He will still be responsible for his actions but they can work with him to make him better. Good luck

More discussions about incarceration
References in periodicals archive ?
prison population has seen a 700% increase since 1970, with the total cost of incarceration exceeding one trillion dollars.
Now, authors Sara Wakefield and Christopher Wildeman take a closer look at what was happening during the "prison boom"--specifically, they ask what happened to children when the incarceration rate grew six-fold.
Mass incarceration is defined by historically extreme rates of imprisonment and by the concentration of incarceration among the most marginalized (Garland, 2001).
It holds that the War on Drugs is virtually the sole culprit--that incarceration rose merely because America decided to start imprisoning nonviolent, low-level drug offenders for absurd amounts of time.
Study authors said the findings suggest an "urgent need" for pediatricians to increase efforts that prevent youth incarceration and mitigate the ensuing health effects of incarceration.
Our unjustified incarceration rates should be of urgent concern to anyone interested in narrowing the educational achievement gap-the persistently lower academic and behavioral performance of black pupils than white pupils, even when their demographic characteristics seem to be similar.
Part of the problem is that mass incarceration has been defined in large part in quantitative and demographic terms, rather than in qualitative terms.
The drug war is the advance guard for the mass incarceration movement, spreading itself across all forms of criminal involvement, increasing both the rate of imprisonment and the length of imprisonment following criminal conviction.
While the rest of the nation is talking about reducing incarceration and its enormous social and economic costs, California is yet again pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into building new jails, reinforcing the state's reliance on imprisonment for decades to come," Lizzie Buchen, advocacy co-coordinator for Californians United for a Responsible Budget, said according to TeleSUR.
Critique: Exceptionally well researched, written, organized and presented, "Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People's Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time" is especially commended to the attention of the non-specialist general reader with an interest in the current national controversy over America's criminal imprisonment policies that have resulted in the incarceration of more than two and a half million Americans.
Raphael highlights some startling statistics to describe the scope and severity of the problem of incarceration and reentry into society.