incapacitate

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incapacitate

(ĭn″kă-păs′ĭ-tāt)
Being made incapable of some function, act or strength. This may be purely physical or intellectual or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
126) of the findings demonstrates that, for the crimes most affected by the rise in incapacitation, the decrease in arrests occurred among a population different than the group actually incapacitated.
Besides the scientific evidence, there are ethical reasons to be wary of the current emphasis on incapacitation.
Instead of the near zero crime condition that some incapacitation models would predict for a quadrupling of the population in prison, rates of violent crime increased with the rise in prison population from 1976 through 1980, then declined substantially in the early 1980s only to turn up again after mid-decade.
It is safe to assume any subject tasered is going to be taken into custody, so physical restraints placed during incapacitation should be automatic.
2) Also, because I have worked in a prison, incapacitation makes sense to me.
From then, the trigger point will increase from over three days to over seven days incapacitation (not counting the day on which the accident happened).
Life Document Storage is an online end-of-life and information transfer company that provides consumers with the ability to not only store their life documents and information in a safe and secure environment, but allows for the transfer of the information upon the death or incapacitation of the consumer.
One has is accused of producing a controlled class B drug and possessing a weapon for the discharge of an electrical incapacitation device.
Certain probation conditions have incapacitation as their goal, for example, house arrest, electronic monitoring, and other forms of close supervision.
The Rand Corporation was the first to develop the theory of incapacitation.
Of course, incapacitation exists only until convicts are let out of prison.
Chapters cover issues like deterrence, incapacitation, and cost, and feature selections from a variety of scholars both historical and modern.