inassimilable

inassimilable

 [in″ah-sim´ĭ-lah-b'l]
not susceptible of being utilized as nutriment.

in·as·sim·i·la·ble

(in'ă-sim'i-lă-bĕl),
Not assimilable; not capable of undergoing assimilation. See: assimilation.

in·as·sim·i·la·ble

(in'ă-sim'il-ă-bĕl)
Not easily incorporated; not capable of undergoing assimilation.
See: assimilation

inassimilable

not susceptible of being utilized as nutriment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Authorities argued that the passengers were inassimilable due to their "Oriental tendencies" towards immorality, dirtiness, radicality, and disease (Buchignani 1977, 88; Sohi 2014; Wallace 2013; Ward 2002).
Rather than raising the issue of the dangers posed by subjecting Arab readerships to particular examples of culturally inassimilable texts--salacious French novels, for example, or radical Soviet polemics--he focuses on the possibility that Arabic will not be able to contain the foreign objects and ideas represented in the translated works and will have to borrow new terms from the languages being translated.
The animal, as Deleuze and Guattari note, is also primarily the "anomalous," that is, the inassimilable element departing from and breaking down every possibility of an integrated and normative series.
In the 1980s and 1990s, rising stars of the radical right such as Filip Dewinter of the then Flemish Block (VNV), Jean-Marie Le Pen of the French Front National, and Pim Fortuyn in the Netherlands, used the ideological trope of 'ethno-pluralism' (4) in order to attack Islam as allegedly alien, inassimilable, and dangerous to 'European' liberal culture.
But it was more than just their size that was inassimilable to me.
As an inassimilable being, he has no proper place within the community and yet stitches the members of the community into a significant whole.
While Hume's insistence on cultural development as the determining factor in national character opens the way for empire to find, in every contact zone, a point of entry for "a uniform imperial culture that stretches across the globe" (xx), Herder's focus on climate presents an inassimilable feature of native cultures that serves as a mote of inevitable resistance to any universal culture.
In its hesitations and emphases, Sordello instances the increasingly fraught relationship between the poetic voice and song as such; yet so too does it convert even the most irreducible and inassimilable elements of language--to the point of stuttering itself--into something approaching a new condition of music.
By way of contrast, the author also critiques Jane Addams and her Hull House Labor Museum's "reification of the color line," in which many ethnic minorities effectively "become white" while other people of darker hues "were explicitly deemed Other and inassimilable.
This aspect of cultural duality is also generally considered inassimilable but Beckett puts this assertion to the test in Chapter 2, 'Walter Newton's history of the world--or Australia'.
The parallelism of the two holes becomes a symbol of the inassimilable and unexpressed pain which is articulated in the narrative, namely, the fundamental fear of human separation and alienation from nature.
I want to say that this voice should end up inassimilable, unappropriable for any position in which there exists the least degree of power.