inanition


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inanition

 [in″ah-nish´un]
the exhausted state due to prolonged undernutrition; starvation.

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn),
Severe weakness and wasting as occurs from lack of food, defect in assimilation, or neoplastic disease.
[L. inanis, empty]

inanition

/in·a·ni·tion/ (in″ah-nish´un) the exhausted state due to prolonged undernutrition; starvation.

inanition

(ĭn′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Exhaustion, as from lack of nourishment or vitality.
2. The condition or quality of being empty.

inanition

[in′ənish′ən]
Etymology: L, inanis, empty
1 an exhausted condition resulting from lack of food and water or a defect in assimilation; starvation.
2 a state of lethargy characterized by a loss of vitality or vigor in all aspects of social, moral, and intellectual life.

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn)
Severe weakness and wasting as results from lack of food, defect in assimilation, or neoplastic disease.

inanition

A state of exhaustion or a bodily disorder arising from lack of any of the nutritional elements such as calories, protein, vitamins, minerals or water.

Parrot,

Jules Marie, French physician, 1829-1883.
Bednar-Parrot syndrome - Synonym(s): Parrot I syndrome
Parrot atrophy of the newborn
Parrot nodes - Synonym(s): Parrot sign
Parrot pseudoparalysis - syphilitic osteochondritis in newborns causing pseudoparalysis in one or more extremities. Synonym(s): syphilitic pseudoparalysis
Parrot sign - indicates congenital syphilis in newborns. Synonym(s): Parrot nodes
Parrot I syndrome - pseudoparalysis; periarticular swelling, onset seldom after 3 months of age. Synonym(s): Bednar-Parrot syndrome; Parrot syphilitic osteochondritis
Parrot II syndrome - failure to thrive, emaciation, edema, dry skin, with subcutaneous fat loss, abdomen flat or distended, hypothermia, slow pulse, decreased metabolic rate. Synonym(s): marasmus; infantile atrophy; inanition; athrepsia
Parrot syphilitic osteochondritis - Synonym(s): Parrot I syndrome
Parrot ulcer - seen in stomatitis or thrush

inanition (iˈ·n·niˑ·shn),

n 1. exhaustion due to deficiency of water or food.
2. lethargic state distinguished by a lack of vigor or vitality in all aspects of life, including intellectual, moral, and social aspects.

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn)
Severe weakness and wasting due to lack of food, defect or disease.

inanition

the exhausted state due to prolonged undernutrition; starvation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter leave behind them the inanition of dispossession to enter into that phase of active struggle, which turns them into crusaders: 'Everybody fighting for country'
Remote oases used to be full of elderly, cantankerous women, bullying their servants, and of younger ones condemned to a life of inanition as the result of a moment's indiscretion.
Sheep becoming carnivorous when kept in abattoirs and developing an aversion for herbivorous foods, waste and die with fatty livers twice their normal size,(15) and Williams (16) has reported the death of a diabetic patient who had received no insulin, the death, "due to inanition," being accompanied by hypoglycemia and convulsions.
will evaluate the ability of HP 228 to attenuate pain associated with the patient's malignancy and toxicity caused by chemotherapy administration, such as nausea, loss of appetite, inanition, weight loss and organ dysfunction.
25) Senior advisers, like Vansittart, worried that a weak response by France and Britain to Italy's ambitions might destroy the league through inanition.
Yet having acquired the skills necessary to prevent even the most severely impaired infants from succumbing to an early death by suffocation, inanition, or sepsis, some pediatric surgeons began to question whether the technological capability to save all newborn life implied a moral imperative as well.
Hence, there are the subtle overtones of exasperation, as well as the strange bitter masochism, that surface as a matter of tone, projecting a speaker incapacitated by his own self-division, and animated only by contemplation of his own inanition.
Pathologic Prevalence, classification % (n = 141) System/etiology Unknown cause 25 Trauma 23 Musculoskeletal (78%), neurologic (10%), respiratory (8%), cardiovascular (2%), predation (2%) Missing 14 Suspect predation Infectious/inflammation 10 Bacterial (79%), parasitic (21%) Autolysis 7 Metabolic disease 7 Gastrointestinal (50%), reproductive (50%) Neoplasia 5 Gastrointestinal (29%), cardiovascular (29%), reproductive (29%), endocrine (10%) Developmental 4 Egg malposition (80%), umbilical hernia (20%) Inanition 2 Failure to thrive after release Degenerative 1 Musculoskeletal Toxin 1 Suspect Bufo marinus toxin ingestion Iatrogenic 1 Cardiopulmonary arrest after blood collection Table 2.
Tuberculosis and inanition were diagnosed, but she refused treatment and still would not eat enough food to gain strength.
Weight loss, low-grade fevers, and inanition were often the only complaints, even in patients with active pulmonary disease.
England is full of wealth, of multifarious produce, supply for human want in every kind; yet England is dying of inanition.
Arjuna, the narrator, is, like his warrior namesake, confused to the point of despair and inanition by the sociocultural circumstances in which he finds himself; suburban American has turned wonder into commodity and narrowed the possibilities for life to a movement toward death.