inactive


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to inactive: Inactive ingredients

inactive

(ĭn-ăk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Not active or tending to be active: inactive students at risk for gaining weight.
2. Chemistry Not readily participating in chemical reactions; inert.
3. Medicine Marked by the absence or lessening of disease activity.

in·ac′tive·ly adv.
in′ac·tiv′i·ty, in·ac′tive·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The criteria of clinical and laboratory tests were served as the standard for determining the active and inactive group, including Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP).
Physically active older people have higher levels of mobility and a lower of risk of disease than those who are inactive.
Women are more likely to report being physically inactive than men (23.
By choosing inactive status, Bar members will reduce their annual fees by $90 and receive automatic exemptions from continuing legal education requirements.
A study of official statistics showed there are 1,379,000 economically inactive women seeking work, compared to 920,000 men.
The TUC said the full "want work" count - a combination of the unemployment count and economically inactive people seeking work - is 4,103,000 people.
Alternatively, your company may want to rebrand or launch a new line but discover (before it is too late) that the new brand is already locked up in inactive or capricious social media accounts.
Measures of glucose tolerance using the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test trended significantly better in the vigorous exercise group--a mean of 93 mg/dL with vigorous exercise, 104 mg/dL with moderate exercise, or 106 mg/dL in the inactive group.
Under state law, registered voters end up on the inactive voting list if they fail to respond to the annual city census.
The city has third highest percentage of inactive adults in the West Midlands, a new report reveals today.
ELDERLY people who take up exercise in later life are three times more likely to stay healthy than their inactive peers, new research suggests.