in vitro


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Related to in vitro: in vivo

in vitro

 [in ve´tro] (L.)
within a glass; observable in a test tube; in an artificial environment.

in vit·ro

(in vē'trō), The term is properly hyphenated when used attributively (in-vitro inhibition of aldolase) but not when it stands as an adjectival or adverbial phrase (inhibition of aldolase in vitro).
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube or culture medium. Compare: in vivo.
[L. in glass]

in vitro

/in vi·tro/ (in ve´tro) [L.] within a glass; observable in a test tube; in an artificial environment.

in vitro

(ĭn vē′trō)
adv. & adj.
In an artificial environment outside a living organism: an egg fertilized in vitro; in vitro fertilization.

in vitro

[invē′trō]
Etymology: L, in, within, vitreus, glassware
occurring in a laboratory apparatus. Compare in vivo.

in vitro

adjective Isolated from living organisms or systems, but artificially maintained; in a test tube, in glass; outside the body, or a living system.

in vitro

Isolated from living organisms or systems, but artificially maintained; in a test tube, in glass; outside the body. Cf In vivo.

in vi·tro

(in vē'trō)
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube or culture media.
Compare: in vivo
[L. in glass]

in vitro

Occurring in the laboratory rather than in the body. Literally, ‘in glass’. Compare IN VIVO.

in vitro

(of biological processes or reactions) made to occur outside the body of an organism in an artificial environment (vitro = glass). For example, in-vitro fertilization of human eggs in the laboratory prior to reimplantation in the mother. Compare IN VIVO.

In vitro

A biological reaction occurring in a laboratory apparatus.
Mentioned in: Herbalism, Western

in vitro

process occurring within the laboratory

in vitro (in vēˑ·trō),

adj located outside the organism in a simulated environment.

in vitro

Term referring to a measurement or a process taking place in a test tube. Example: the measurement of the cholesterol content of the crystalline lens done in a test tube.

in vi·tro

(in vē'trō)
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube.
[L. in glass]

in vitro (in ve´tro),

adj/adv occurring in a laboratory.

in vitro

[L.] literally within a glass, i.e. outside the living body; observable in a test tube; in an artificial environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many studies have reported the effects of sucrose concentration on induction flowering in in vitro culture [13, 9, 14].
Para as avaliacoes anatomicas, foram utilizadas folhas coletadas do primeiro no de ramos, da base para o apice, de plantulas mantidas in vitro e de uma arvore adulta de campo (ex vitro) localizada proximo a Portaria do campus da Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), situada a 855 m de altitude, 21[degrees]13'51.
In addition it has shown a low potential to select for resistance in vitro.
The amount of VEEV collected from mosquitoes that salivated in vitro for <3 minutes was significantly less than the amount collected from mosquitoes allowed to salivate for 45 minutes (p<0.
They also include in vitro fertilization in which very high doses of hormones are given to women to make them produce more ova, and may involve the use of women as egg donors and as providers of surrogate wombs.
Today, heart transplants save 2,000 lives every year, and in vitro fertilization helped infertile Americans have 11,000 babies in 1995 alone.
The study may also have implications for in vitro research into the mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance.
OECD 439: in vitro skin irritation (revised in 2013)
Accordingly, attention has increasingly come to focus on in vitro models that simulate the development of two basic types of brain cells, neurons and gila.
The PICM-19 cells grown in vitro synthesize liver specific proteins such as albumin and transferrin, and display enhanced liver-specific functions such as ureagenesis and cytochrome P450 activity.
He did make one telling point, however, that more of the human embryos produced in in vitro fertilization clinics are destroyed than ever would be by human embryo research.