impulse


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impulse

 [im´puls]
1. a sudden pushing force.
2. a sudden uncontrollable determination to act.
cardiac impulse a heartbeat palpated over the left side of the chest at the apex of the heart. See also point of maximal impulse.
impulse control disorders a group of mental disorders characterized by repeated failure to resist an impulse to perform some act harmful to oneself or to others. In spite of the act's being socially unacceptable or inconsistent with the rest of the person's personality or lifestyle, he or she feels pleasure or emotional release upon doing it. Disorders in this category include intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, pathological gambling, pyromania, and trichotillomania.
nerve impulse the electrochemical process propagated along nerve fibers.

im·pulse

(im'pŭls),
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
3. The action potential of a nerve fiber.
[L. im-pello, pp. -pulsus, to push against, impel (inp-)]

impulse

/im·pulse/ (im´puls)
1. a sudden pushing force.
2. a sudden uncontrollable determination to act.

cardiac impulse  movement of the chest wall caused by the heart beat.
ectopic impulse 
1. the impulse that causes an ectopic beat.
2. a pathologic nerve impulse that begins in the middle of an axon and proceeds simultaneously towards the cell body and the periphery.
nerve impulse  the electrochemical process propagated along nerve fibers.

impulse

(ĭm′pŭls′)
n.
Physiology The electrochemical transmission of a signal along a nerve fiber that produces an excitatory or inhibitory response at a target tissue, such as a muscle or another nerve.

impulse

[im′puls]
Etymology: L, impellere, to drive
1 (in psychology) a sudden irresistible, often irrational inclination, urge, desire, or action resulting from a particular feeling or mental state.
2 also called nerve impulse, neural impulse, (in physiology) the electrochemical process involved in neural transmission. impulsive, adj.

impulse

Cardiac pacing An electrical stimulus delivered by a pacemaker Psychiatry A psychic striving; an instinctive urge

im·pulse

(im'pŭls)
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
3. The action potential of a nerve fiber.

impulse

change in momentum produced by a force. angular impulse moment applied to a rotating body or object multiplied by the duration of the application (newtons×metres×seconds, N.m.s). linear impulse force applied to a translating body or object multiplied by duration of the application (newtons×seconds, N.s).

impulse

nerve action potential

impulse,

n chiropractic technique characterized by a short, quick thrust.

im·pulse

(im'pŭls)
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
[L. im-pello, pp. -pulsus, to push against, impel (inp-)]

impulse,

n a surge of electric current for a short time span; e.g., in a 60-cycle AC current, there are 120 impulses per second. See also impression, maxillary.
impulse, muscle,
n a wave of excitation along a muscle fiber initiated at the neuromuscular endplate; accompanied by chemical and electrical changes at the surface of the muscle fiber and by activation of the contractile elements of the muscle fiber; detectable electronically (electromyographically); and followed by a transient refractory period.
impulse, nerve,
n a wave of excitation along a nerve fiber initiated by a stimulus; accompanied by chemical and electrical changes at the surface of the nerve fiber and followed by a transient refractory period during which further stimulation has no effect.

impulse

1. a sudden pushing force.
2. a sudden uncontrollable act.
3. a nerve impulse.

cardiac impulse
movement of the chest wall caused by the heartbeat. Called also apex beat.
nerve impulse
the electrochemical process propagated along nerve fibers.

Patient discussion about impulse

Q. Daughter's impulsivity is reduced to a great extent from those days when she used to be without medicines. My daughter was very impulsive before taking her medicines. Her impulsivity is reduced to a great extent from those days when she used to be without medicines and had a very high impulsive behavior. Now I have asked the doctor to take off the medicines as she is going well. But the doctor said that he cannot stop the medicines suddenly as it will have adverse effects in my daughter. What may be the reason? My daughter is well without medicines. This is causing me great confusion.

A. I certainly agree with goodday222. Your daughter's impulsive behavior may not be displayed because she is continuing to take the meds to control it. I do not think the meds your daughter is taking would fix the impulsive behavior.

From my experience, if you want your daughter to eliminate the impulsive behavior, you should make sure she starts participating in some regular physical activity. Running or swimming in a school program would be best, but soccer, basketball, or volleyball would also be good. Dance classes would also help (ballet, tap, modern, or jazz). I'm not suggesting a few times per month. I'm suggesting an intensive, lifestyle changing athletic program that she commits to for the next few years.

If she can do this kind of activity, then when you stop the meds for the summer, you will find she is growing up more appropriately and her impulsive behavior is reduced.

Rodger Bailey, MS

More discussions about impulse
References in classic literature ?
The impulse which had driven Ralph to take this action was the result of a very swift little piece of reasoning, and thus, perhaps, was not quite so much of an impulse as it seemed.
Here were we, drawn together by mutual rage and the impulse toward cooperation, led off into forgetfulness by the establishment of a rude rhythm.
But he did not reason it, did not reason at all; he acted on impulse.
Life flowed past him, deep and wide and varied, continually impinging upon his senses, demanding of him instant and endless adjustments and correspondences, and compelling him, almost always, to suppress his natural impulses.
Acting on a sudden impulse, I held out the letter to him as he spoke.
20,000 cubic feet; and since the contents of your cannon do not exceed 54,000 cubic feet, it would be half full; and the bore will not be more than long enough for the gas to communicate to the projectile sufficient impulse.
But from the beginning there was a reawakening of interest in the life of the common people--an impulse which is not inconsistent with the love of the remote and unusual, but rather means the discovery of a neglected world of novelty at the very door of the educated and literary classes.
Again, after speaking of the frustration of some impulses which is involved in acquiring the habits of a civilized adult, he continues:
Karain" was begun on a sudden impulse only three days after I wrote the last line of "The Nigger," and the recollection of its difficulties is mixed up with the worries of the unfinished "Return," the last pages of which I took up again at the time; the only instance in my life when I made an attempt to write with both hands at once as it were.
I am always involving myself in some scrape or other, by acting on impulse.
I am astonished'--both the teachers were astonished--'I suppose it is an impulse which induces you to take the part of every grovelling and debased person that comes in your way'--both the teachers supposed so too.
Edna Pontellier could not have told why, wishing to go to the beach with Robert, she should in the first place have declined, and in the second place have followed in obedience to one of the two contradictory impulses which impelled her.